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A SPECTACULAR COMPENDIUM OF USEFUL INFORMATION
1) ANONYMOUS. Valuable Secrets Concerning Arts and Trades: Or, Approved Directions, from The Best Artists, for The Various Methods of Engraving on Brass, Copper, or Steel; Of the Composition of Metals; Of the Compostion of Varnishes; Of Mastichs, Cements, Sealing-Wax, &c. &c.; Of the Glass Manufactory. Various Imitations of Precious Stones, and French Paste; Of colours and Painting, Sueful for Carriage Painting, Useful for Carriage Painters; Of Painting on Paper; Of Compositions for Limners; Of Transparent Colours; Colours to Dye Skins or Gloves; To Colour or Varnish Copper-Plate Prints; Of Painting on Glass; Of Colours of All Sorts, for Oil, Water, and Crayons; Of Preparing the Lapis Lazuli to Make Ultramarine; Of the Art of Gilding; The Art of Dying Woods, Bones, &c.; The Art of Casting in Moulds; Of Making Useful sorts of Ink; The Art of Making Wines; Of the Compositions of Vinegars; Of Liquors, Essential Oils, &c.; Of the Confectionary Business; The Art of comparing Snuffs; Of taking out Spots and Stains; Art of Fishing, Angling, Bird-Catching, &c.; And subjects Curious, Entertaining, and Useful. Containing upwards of One Thousand approved Receipts relative to Arts and Trades. Dublin, by James Williams, 1778. 528

Later sprinkled calf (in “the old style”, over marbled boards, with slightly raised bands, spine gilt in 5 compartments, 4 with a centrally-placed gilt flower-head emblem, the fifth with a burgundy calf label titled in gilt, marbled endpapers, all edges yellow; xxvii + pp. 312; well-nigh immaculate condition inside and out, bar occasional light markings, leaving this a splendid copy of a wonderful early Irish “printed commonplace book”.

First edition. Loosely-inserted is a 1952 ALS by the bookdealer, W.D. John of Newport, Monmouth, to a “Mrs. Bertram K. Liddle of Brookline, Mass.”, discussing a 1688 edition of a work entitled “The Arts Treasure of Rarities and Curious Inventions”, possibly seen as an earlier form of this work? In the “Preface” to this edition, “The Editor” describes the book as having a French route: “It is but of a late date since those arts and trades which constitute the wealth and the commerce of Great Britain, were overlooked, despised, and ranked as inferior conditions. Through the gloom of ignorance, they now begin to increase their lustre, economical order, and necessary distribution, in this great kingdom.” Interestingly, loosely-inserted in this copy is a 1952 ALS by the bookdealer, “W.D. John of Newport, Monmouth”, to a “Mrs. Bertram K. Liddle of Brookline, Mass.”, discussing a 1688 edition of a work entitled “The Arts Treasure of Rarities and Curious Inventions”, possibly seen as an earlier form of this work?

SUPERB HAND-COLOURED PLATES OF OUR EDIBLE MUSHROOMS
2)BADHAM, Charles David. A Treatise on The Esculent Fungi of England, containing An Account of Their History, Uses, Characters, Development, Structure, Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and Preserving, &c. Reeve, Brothers, 1847. 598

Tall 8vo. Contemporary full green calf, covers with multiple fillet borders in gilt and blind, spine gilt in 6 compartments, 5 with elaborate gilt floriate tooling, with a recent burgundy label at head, titled in gilt (“Edible Mushooms/Badham”), marbled endpapers; x + pp. 138, with an accurate engraved title vignette below the title, showing multiple species, 21 lithographed plates, of which 18 are finely hand coloured and finished with gum arabic varnish highlights; joints slightly tender, while internally, well-nigh immaculate, leaving this a very handsome copy of a classic work on mushrooms, and their culinary enticements.

First edition. Preface: “No country is perhaps richer in Esculent Funguses than our own; we have upwards of thirty species abounding in our woods. No markets might therefore be better supplied than the English, and yet England is the only country in Europe where this important and savoury food is from ignorance or prejudice, left to perish ungathered.” To encourage the naissant gatherer, the author encourages him with Mouth-Watering Recipes such as this for “Stuffed Morells [sic]”: “Choose the freshest and whitest Morells, open the stalk at the bottom; wash and wipe them well, fill with Veal Stuffing, Anchovy, or any rich farce you please, securing the ends, and dressing between thin slices of Bacon.”

Nissen BBI 126.






3) “BEE BOX”: WADEY, H.J. The Bee Craftsman; A Short Guide to The Life History and Management of The Honey-Bee. Petts Wood, Kent, A.G. Smith, 1945. 165

and a quantity of others (pamphlets) on BEES, and 2 further books, one in the same series - “Bees and Honey” by George A. Carter (1946)- both with dust-jackets, ALL contained in a specially constructed green cloth fall-down back box, with crimson leather labels, and green silk pull tag, titled in gilt: “Bee: Pamphlets, etc.”.

The pamphlet titles comprise: Bee Hives (1964); Honey Extractors, Strainers and Bottling Tanks (1952); Beekeeping (1951); Diseases of Bees (1951); Honey from Hive to Market (1953 and 1963); Living with Varroa Jacobsoni (1992). The other book is “Swarming: Its Control and Prevention” by L.E. Snelgrove (1941).


DELUXE BINDING
4)BEETON, Isabella. The Book of Household Management, Comprising Information for The Mistress; Housekeeper; Cook; Kitchen-Maid; Butler; Footman; Coachman; Valet; Parlour-Maid; Butler; Footman; Coachman; Valet; Parlour-Maid; Housemaid; Lady’s-Maid; General Servant; Laundry-Maid; Nurse and Nursemaid; Monthly, Wet, and Sick-Nurse; Governess. Also Sanitary, Medical and Legal Memoranda. With a History of The Origin, Properties and Uses of All Things Connected with Home Life and Comfort. Ward, Lock and Co., 1889. 698

8vo. Original dark green cloth, lavishly blocked in gilt and black, with copious food-related vignettes, all edges gilt; xlvi (+ 2pp. coloured plate list) + pp. 1644, with 13 full-page coloured plates, 2 folding, copious black and white illustrations throughout; includes Chapters on Australian Cookery (Wallaby Roast, Parrot Pie, Kangaroo Tail Soup, etc.);

“Deluxe Binding”, “Entirely New Edition, Revised, Corrected and Greatly Enlarged, containing New Coloured Plates and Numerous Full-Page and Other Engravings. Several Hundreds of New Recipes for English, French, German, Italian, American, Australian and Indian Cookery, New Menus for Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners, Teas and Suppers with Much Valuable Information upon Household and Domestic Matters.” The standard great cookery book in unusually fine condition. Evening Standard: "A storehouse of knowledge which no woman who has her household to consider can afford to do without." Arthur Conan Doyle: "This book has more wisdom to the square inch than any work of man” This is a wonderful testimonial, when one remembers that the last edition thus praised contains more than 80,000 square inches of closely packed information. Of note is the inclusion of recipes for American and Colonial cuisines so that Britons living under other skies may learn how to combine the dishes of their adopted country with those of the Motherland."
cf. Bitting p. 32.



AMERICAN INDIAN HERBAL
5)BOWKER, Pierpont F. The [Mohawk] Indian Vegetable Family Instructer: Containing The Names and Descripitons of All The Most Useful Herbs and Plants that Grow in This Country, with Their Medicinal Qualities Annexed; Also A Treatise on Many of The Lingering Diseases to Which Mankind are Subject, with New and Plain Arguments respecting The Management of The Same; with A Large List of Recipes, which have been Carefully Selected from Indian Prescriptions and from Those Very Persons who were Cured by The Same after every other Remedy had Failed. Utica, by Jared Doolittle, 1851 327

12mo. Original black morocco-backed printed boards, titled and ruled into 4 compartments in gilt on spine, and titled in black on upper cover; pp. 180; some heavy rubbing to binding, but to the boards only, with some fading to printed title, and spine slightly holed at head, while internally there is some light spotting and browning throughout, but overall, this remains a good and tight little copy of an extremely rare American Indian Herbal.

Second edition (We know of one other edition, apparently printed in 1836). Pencil ownership inscription of Martha G. Dopp (of New York), born 1841. The book lists no fewer than 194 different plants, and their various curative effects, before moving on to list 176 recipes for making the solutions, tinctures and poultices from them.





POSSIBLY UNIQUE CLOTH BINDING –
BRILLAT-SAVARIN FOR THE BRITISH
6) [BRILLAT-SAVARIN] SIMPSON, Leonard Francis. The Handbook of Dining; Or, How to Dine Theoretically, Philosophically, and Historically Considered. Based Chiefly upon The “Physiologie du Gout” of Brillat-Savarin. Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, & Roberts, 1859 298

8vo. Original black embossed cloth, spine titled in gilt at head, and gilt tooled at head and foot, covers blocked with an all-embracing pattern of gold spots, tuscan-red endpapers; [xx] + pp. 244 (+ 24pp. detailed publishers’ booklist at rear); well-nigh immaculate inside and out, bar minimal fraying at foot, this is a splendid little culinary celebration is a highly unusual binding.

First edition. Preface: “Brillat-Savarin’s Maxims for Dining and Giving Dinners are now placed before The Amphitryons of London in “The Handbook of Dining”... No person can read through these pages without coming to the conclusion that Gastronomy is a science well worthy the study of persons of intellect of both sexes; and it will lead them to the conviction that A little more Study in the Selection of Their Dishes, The Management of Their Kitchen, and Due Attention to The Comfort of Their Guests, will Enhance Tenfold The Pleasure of The Table and will Make Their Dinners Select.” Multi-coloured engraved bookplate of renowned Collector on Gastronomy, Harry Schraemli.

Bitting p. 437.




A SOUGHT AFTER HERBAL AND ANALYSIS OF EDIBLE PLANTS AND FLOWERS
7)BRYANT, Charles (“of Norwich”). “Flora Diatetica”, or History of Esculent Plants, both Domestic and Foreign. In which They are Accurately Described, and Reduced to Their Linnaean Generic and Specific Names. With Their English Names Annexed and Ranged under Eleven General Heads, viz. 1) Roots; 2) Shoots, Stalks, &c.; 3) Leaves; 4) Flowers; 5) Berries; 6) Stone-Fruit; 7) Apples; 8) Legumens; 9) Grain; 10) Nuts; 11) Funguses. And a Particular Account of The Manner of Using Them; Their Native Places of Growth; Their Several Varieties, and Physical Properties: Together with Whatever is otherwise Curious, or Very Remarkable in Each Species. For B. White, at Horace’s Head, in Fleet Street, 1783. 598

8vo. Contemporary black half morocco, over marbled boards, with a later spine, entitled at head: “Bryant’s Esculent Plants”; xvi + pp. 379 (+ pp. 12 “indexes” of Latin and English Names at rear); neatly rebacked with a flat black calf spine, ruled in gilt in 6 compartments, and titled in the top one, while internally immaculate, leaving this an extremely desirable copy of one of the rarer works on comestibles come from the ground, and how to exploit them.

First edition. Preface: “Whether we view Mankind in a natural or civilised state, we shall find that the principal part of his daily food, and also most of the articles necessary to his comfortable enjoyment of Life, are drawn from the vegetable kingdom; every endeavour therefore to point out with precision and accuracy the Species of Plants, immediately adapted to teh use of man, must carry with ait its own recommendation.” Engraved armorial bookplate of Edward Duke. “Johannes Salberg’s rather cursory Latin thesis on food plants [“Fructus Esculenti”(1763)] and the prodding of a pharmacist friend [Rose] motivated Charles Bryant to work on a detailed, authoritative work for Gardeners, Cooks, and Gourmets ... The Fruit Chapters in his “Flora Diatetica” ... describe many species and some cultivars often at length, and comment on their taste” (cf. Janson, “Pomona’s Harvest”, p. 199).
Pritzel 1301; Stafleu & Cowan 858; BMNH I, 273; NOT IN HUNT.



SECRETS OF BRITISH WINE PRODUCTION

8)CARNELL, P.P.Q A Treatise on Family Wine Making: Calculated for Making Excellent Wines from The Various Fruits of This United Country; In Relation to Strength, Brilliancy, Health, and Economy; Explanatory of The Whole Process, and Every Other Requisite Guide after The Wine is Made and In The Cellar; Composed from Practical Knowledge and Written Expressly and Exclusively for Domestic Use, Containing Sixty Different Sorts of Wine. To Which is Subjoined The Description of Part of a Recent British Vintage, inclusive of An Interesting Experimental Lecture. Sherwood, Neely & Jones, Parternoster Row; Sold by T. Hookham, Jun. and Co., Old Bond-Street; Gossling, 308 Oxford-Street; Hatchard, Piccadilly; J. and G. Todd, York, 1814. 598

8vo. Original grey-blue boards, neatly rebacked, with a new paper label at head of spine, titled in black; [xviii] + pp. 19-158 (+ 2pp. contents leaf at rear, and 16pp. various detailed publishers’ adverts. at rear; upper cover slightly stained at upper outer corner, and some scuffing to lower board, edges rubbed, and occasional light spotting and dust-marking internally, but nevertheless, this remains a fine and unsophisticated copy of an important treatise.

First edition. Preface: “It is hoped that [Domestic Wine Makers] will lay aside all predjudice, follow the processes and precepts herein stated, and thereby enable themselves to make many generous and brilliant vernacular wines, as any imported from the continent: “To cleanse the cloudy front of wrinkled care; And dry the tearful sluices of despair.” Includes instructions for 60 different wines, from Red Gooseberry and Damson, to Ginger and Several Types of Mead.

SOHO CHINESE COOKERY

9) CHENG, S.K. Shanghai Restaurant Chinese Cookery Book. [Privately Printed], [1936] 168

8vo. Original crimson cloth, titled in black on the upper cover; [vi] + pp. 102, immaculate condition inside and out.

First edition. Preface: “All ingredients can be obtained from The Shanghai Emporium, 6 Greek Street, London W1. In the following pages we shall give a series of dishes such as would be supplied to a party of 8 persons so that the complete whole should be a well balanced dinner and give every satisfaction ...”

A GUIDE TO THE MOST POPULAR BEAN
10) [COFFEE] HAARER, A.E. (“District Agricultural Officer, Moshi”). A Planter’s Guide to the Production of Arabica Coffee. Dar es Salaam, The Government Printer, c. 1930

8vo. Originla cream wrappers, titled in black on the upper cover, inside a black border, stapled; pp. 31, with 9 lithographed illustrations in text of Coffee Plants at different stages of growth; well-nigh immaculate condition inside and out, this is a rare “Colonial” survival guide for this important crop.

First edition. Ownership stamp to upper wrapper of the “Trade Information Office” of “His Majesty’s Dependencies”. This is an essential “how-to” guide, covering everything from “First Steps in Planting”, through “Plantation Care and Improvement”, to a straight comparison between the different qualities of The Arabica varieties: “Bourbon”, “Nyasa”, “Java”, (and 2 varieties imported from India and planted) “Jackson” and “Kent”.




11)COOKE, Mordecai Cubitt. Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms: What to Eat and What to Avoid. SPCK, 1894 198

Sm. 8vo. Original grey cloth, the upper cover and spine blocked with multiple images of mushrooms, in full colour, titled in crimson on the upper cover; viii + pp. 126 (+ 8pp. publisher’s booklist at rear), with 18 fine high-tone chromolithographed plates, illustrating 40 species; some fading to spine title, and light rubbing to corners, while internally immaculate bar some fingering to the lower margins of B8 and C1, leaving this a very good copy of this essential guide.

First edition. Preface: “There are certainly some 70 or 80 common species to be found in this country which may be eaten with safety, but if only ten or twelve of these are well-known, they will furnish all the variety which an ordinary person will require ... We have ourselves eaten of more than 60 different species ... Persistent fungus-eaters never experiment on unknown species.” This is a fascinating and handsomely-produced little guide, by a renowned expert in the field.

Freeman 801.




A DELIGHTFUL COPY, WRITTEN FOR:
“THE LOVERS OF THE GASTRONOMIC ART”

12) CRAWFORD, Frances. French Cookery Adapted for English Families. Richard Bentley, 1853 598

8vo. Original grass-green cloth, titled in gilt on the spine, which has 3 elaborate gilt vignettes of a Brace of Game Birds, a Boar’s Head with an Apple in its Mouth, and with a Selection of Landed Fish, at head, yellow endpapers; xxviii + pp. 210; infinitesimal uniform fading to spine, with titles still very bright, and two tiny flecks of discoloration to lower cover, but overall this is an excellent tight copy of the extremely rare first edition.

First edition. Preface: “In order to render [the book] more useful, I have made every rule as plain and simple as it was possible. I have given the French names in most cases, because they are more generally known, and will, therefore, be better appreciated by The Lovers of The Gastronomic Art.” a splendid representative trawl through “French Cuisine” adapted for the English table, using only French titles (“Pate de Lievre”, etc.), with Soups and Sauces strongly represented. The book proved so popular that first and second edition appeared in the same year and a third edition appeared 2 years later. This book is very scarce, with only 2 copies of any edition appearing in the rooms in over 30 years. Only 5 copies of the second edition are recorded in UK and US libraries, and only 7 of the first edition. Ownership inscription to front free-endpaper: “Mrs. Jennings, Sept. 8th 1853. Boulogne sur Mer.”

Bitting p.105; Cagle 638.


RARE CRISPLY-WRITTEN CURRY COOK BOOK:
“NO HIGH AND MIGHTY GOBBLE-GOBBLE”
13) SANTIAGOE, Daniel (“General Servant, Son of Francis Daniel, Butler and Fiddler, Trichinopoly, Madras, India, and Colombo, Ceylon”). The Curry Cook’s Assistant; or Curries, How to Make Them in England in Their Original Style. Kegan Paul, Trench & Co., 1889 350

Small 8vo. Original crimson cloth-backed matching boards, titled in black on the upper cover, with relevant advertisements, to lower board; xx + pp. 80; mimimal discolouration of boards, and slight rubbing to extremities, but overall, this is a remarkable survival of a fragile piece of Colonial Cookery.

Third edition. Santiagoe was brought to England by John Loudoun Shand, who contributed “The Preface”, and for whom he worked as a “Gentleman’s Gentleman”. The book is written in a delightful broken English, but The Indian Recipes are absolutely solid, and include several for making Curry Powders - Those who are unable to find the ingredients are recommended to trust their grocer! Interestingly, the “Third” appears to be the only edition that ever turns up, although The Author says the first edition was in 500 copies. The Author was Ceylonese and describes himself on The Title as: "Son of Francis Daniel, Butler and Fiddler, Trichinopoly, Madras, India, and Colombo, Ceylon: Ceylon Tea House Waiter [at] Royal Jubilee Exhibition, Liverpool, 1887 [and] International Exhibition, Glasgow, 1888". A contemporary review in “Saturday Review” of October 22nd 1887, describes the book thus: “Nobody need think that Mr. Santiagoe is unintelligible. His English may be “pigeon”, but it is a much more easily digestible tongue than the high and mighty gobble-gobble of some of our own professors of style and matter.”

Not in Bitting or Cagle. 3 copies only in OCLC: Cornell, Radcliffe, and Wellcome; NUC adds NYPL; there is also a copy in the BL.




AN IMPORTANT GUIDE TO WINES AND SPIRITS
14)DAVIES, John. The Inkeeper and Butler’s Guide, or a Directory for Making and Managing British Wines; with Directions for The Managing, Colouring, and Flavouring of Foreign Wines and Spirits, and for Making British Compounds, Peppermint, Anniseed [[checkspelling], Shrub, etc. [Privately] Printed for and Sold by R. Davies, [n.d. but c. 1820]. 298

Large 12mo. Contemporary burgundy half calf, over marbled boards, flat spine ruled in gilt in 4 compartments, titled in one “The Butler’s Guide”; [iv] + pp. 199; some light rubbing to extremities of binding, and uniform light browning internally, but overall, despite this remains a very good and solid little copy of this fascinating book.

15th edition “Revised and Enlarged by His Son”. A Recipe book for making Inebriating Liquors! The part devoted to wine is divided into English and Foreign Wines. In the “English” section there are Recipes for Claret, Champagne, Port Sack, Raisin, Currant, Orange and Many Domestic Fruit Wines. The “Foreign” section includes Directions on the Managing of a Wine Vault; How to Correct Coloration, and Acidity, including "A Remedy for Claret that drinks foul." Sections on Beer and Cider making. Pages 182-191 contain "The Necessaries always wanted in Wine and Spirit Vaults and Gentlemen’s Cellars".

cf. Gabler p. 71; cf. Bitting p. 117 (8th edition only). Rare.


MUCH WIT AND LEARNING “NOT STUCK ON LIKE SUPERFLUOUS BAYLEAVES, WHICH GRACE A PYRAMID OF JELLY”!

15) DODS, Mistress Margaret (“of The Cleikum Inn, St. Ronans”). The Cook and Housewife’s Manual: A Practical System of Modern Domestic Cookery and Family Management; Containing a Compendium of French Cookery, and Of Fashionable Confectionery, Preparations for Invalids, a Selection of Cheap Dishes, and Numerous Useful Miscellaneous Receipts in The Various Branches of Domestic Economy. Edinburgh, Oliver & Boyd, and London, Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., 1842. 228
Crown 8vo. Original tan cloth, covers ruled in blind, covers ruled in blind, spine with a gilt cartouche at head, containing the title; pp. 491 (+ 1p. critical notices of previous editions); 2 or 3 worm holes to upper cover, and a tiny well-nigh immaculate inside and out, bar very occasional and minimal spotting or marking, leaving this a very good and solid copy of this renowned work of contemporary cuisine, and more.

Seventh edition. According to the advertisement printed at the front of this book, the “Comprehensive Treatise on Domestic Brewing, written expressly for this work”, has only just been added for this and subsequent editions. As a contemporary review from “The Scotsman” eloquently put it: “This book is evidently got up by some person who knows La Cuisine well, and something else besides - There are both wit and learning in it; and these not stuck on like the superfluous Bay Leaves which grace a Pyramid of Jelly, but entering, like well-prepared condiments, into its very substance - It is a handsome and most useful publication, and well deserves to be in the hands of every housewife in the kingdom.”

cf. Bitting p. 125.



PRIVATELY PRINTED “EMIRATES COOKERY”
16)[EMIRATES COOKERY] TARBUTTON, Hilda [and Others]. Favourite Recipes of Ras al Ham[ra]. [United Arab Emirates]. [Privately Printed (?) in The UEA], c.1945. 298

4to. Original pink wrappers, title printed boldly on the upper wrapper in black, incorporating a substantial black vignette of 2 Camels tethered beneath a Pair of Palm Trees, fronting a Sand Dune, beneath a Burning Sun, now contained in a specially-constructed black cloth fall-down-back box, with a crimson leather label to the spine, titled in gilt: “Emirates Cookery/Ras al Hamra”, and impressed: “Privately Printed”; pp. 226 (printed typescript on one side only), with a splendid lithographed additional title caricature by an unidentified artist, showing a Camel in a Chef’s Hat, sitting Cross-Legged and Stirring a Cooking Pot, while reading a Cook Book, and 5 others, each similarly fronting the various “Chapters” (“Soups and Appetizers”, “Main Courses”, “Desserts”, “Miscellaneous” and “Menus” - the “Miscellaneous” section, which is actually featured in the book, before the “Menus”, changing the sequence of the “Contents” leaf, is simply a further collection of both savoury and sweet dishes, some with the addition of alcohol(!); some fraying and abbrasion to the upper wrapper, affecting the final 2 letters of the title and the fore-edge, and a sprinkling of spots to the upper part, and minimal loss at the head of the spine, though the block is holding firm, leaving this what must be an extremely rare and impromptu selection of recipes collected at a very specific time and place.

First and Only edition. This would appear to be a collection of personal recipes collated from a truly international group of westerners “on station” in The Middle East. The only fully-identified major contributor is the above Hilda Tarbutton, coming from South Texas. Others are simply surnames and initials, but occasionally a clue will be added to the recipes, identifying the nationalities of French “Galibert”, Dutch “Oosterbaan” and “de Boehmler”. A complete “Mexican Dinner Menu” is donated by Tarbutton; a “Maltese Friday Lent Lunch” comes from “L. Naudi”; even a regional British recipe, “Stargazy Pie” from “J. Dart” - apparently a piscine speciality from Cornwall: “Traditionally the heads of the fish are left on, hence Stargazy”!





“THE MOST READABLE WORK[ON TOBACCO],
AND THE BEST KNOWN”
17) FAIRHOLT, F.W. Tobacco: Its History and Associations, Including an Account of The Plant and Its Manufacture; with Its Modes of Use in All Ages and Countries. Chatto and Windus, 1876 228

8vo. Original crimson cloth, richly tooled in gilt and black, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, surmounting on the spine A Red Indian Pipe of Peace, smoke billowing upwards, while on the upper cover, which is doubly ruled in black, is a substantial gilt and black vignette of “A Tobacconist’s Shop” from the time of James I, black endpapers; [viii] + pp. 322 (+ 32pp. detailed publishers’ booklist at rear), with an excellent hand-coloured engraved frontispiece, with tissue-guard, of 3 different Tobacco Plant and Their Parts, and copious wood-engraved illustrations throughout concerning Tobacco, and its Paraphernalia; an excellent copy inside and out, bar slight fading to the upper outer edge of the front pastedown, and minimal bubbling to the foot of the lower board, leaving this an extremely handsome copy of this sought-after book on the subject..

First edition. Arents: "The most readable and informative of popular 19th century English works on the subject and the best known." The book discusses The Tobacco Plant; Tobacco in America and Europe; The Literary Associations of Tobacco; The Use of Pipes, Cigars, Snuff, and everything else associated with The Art of Smoking.
Arents 1667.


A CLASSIC COOKERY BOOK,
FURTHER IMPROVED

18) FARLEY, John. The London Art of Cookery, and Housekeeper’s Complete Assistant. On a New Plan, Made Plain and Easy to The Understanding of Every Housekeeper, Cook, and Servant in The Kingdom. Containing, Proper Directions for The Choice of All Kinds of Provisions; Instructions for Trussing Poultry; Roasting and Boiling All Sorts of Butcher’s Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; Baking, Broiling, and Frying; Sauces for Every Occasion; Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes; Ragoos and Fricassees; Made Dishes, both Plain and Elegant; All Sorts of Pies and Puddings; Pancakes and Fritters; Proper Instructions for Dressing Fruits and Vegetables; Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. Containing, The Preparation of Hams, Tongues, and Bacon. To Keep Garden Stuffs and Fruits in Perfection; The Whole Art of Confectionary; The Preparation of Sugars; Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries; Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies; Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Elegant Ornaments for Entertainments; Instructions for Carving; Necessary Articles for Sea-Faring Persons; Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To Which is Added, An Appendix, Containing Considerations on Culinary Poisons; Directions for Making Broths, &c. Embellished with A Head of The Author, and A Bill of Fare for Every Month in The Year, Elegantly Engraven on Thirteen Copper Plates. For J. Scatcherd and J. Whittaker; B. Law; and G. and T. Wilkie, 1796 350

8vo. Recent calf-backed tan cloth boards, spine ruled in gilt in 6 compartments with a burgundy morocco label at head, titled in gilt; [xxxvi (including “Contents” leaves) + pp. 459, with an excellent engraved portrait frontispiece of The Author, “Principal Cook at The London Tavern”, 12 engraved plates of Monthly Menus, as to be laid on the Table, and a 3pp. pair of “Tables” at rear, comparing cost of foodstuffs, by pound and stone, and Servants’ Wages; externally immaculate, while internally, there are new endpapers, and there is some staining to the inner margins of the “Menu” plates, as well as light browning to the frontispiece, leaving this, however, an extremely solid copy of a copious and extensive guide.

Seventh edition (according to Bitting). Preface to The First Edition.: “As This work is intended for the use of All Ranks in general,. not only those who have attained a Tolerable Knowledge of Cookery, but also to those who are but Young in Experience, we have occasionally given The Most Simple with the Most Sumptuous Dishes, and thereby directed them How Properly to Decorate the Table of either The Peer or The Mechanic.” Updated preface to this, The Seventh Edition: “We added upwards of 200 New and Elegant Receipts in The Various Branches of Cookery, &c., &c., to The Last Edition. The singular Approbation they met with has induced us to attempt still further improvements, and We have accordingly enriched the present Edition, with Several New and Useful Receipts, without depriving the Work of a single Article it before contained; but in order to make room for them, We have considerably increased the Number of Pages in This Edition.”

“SHAKESPEARE DINNERS”, “CITY MENUS”, “THE WINE CELLAR”, ETC.
19) “FIN-BEC” [JERROLD, William Blanchard] (“Author of The Epicure’s Year Book”). The Book of Menus. Grant & Co., 1876 498

8vo. Original green cloth, upper cover lavishly tooled in gilt and black, with a latticed floriate panel surmounted by the title in gilt, topped by a gilt Lobster, and tailed by a Wild Boar, the spine with a gilt Wild Strawberry, surmouted by the title, all edges gilt; viii + pp. 302 [each page with a crimson fillet border, and matching floriate cornerpieces] (+ 8pp. detailed adverts. at rear), with a fine tinted lithographed additional title, comprising 4 vignettes of Revelry, also recording additional authorship of “The Epicure’s Year Book, The Cupboard Papers,” Etc. “Tout se fait en dinant dans le siecle ou nous sommes, et c’est par les diners qu’on gourverne lest hommes. Moliere”; immaculate condition inside and out.

First edition. Preface: “The Epicure is the antithesis of The Glutton: it is to The Epicure that this book is addressed. He is simply the moderate, cultivated man who knows what to eat, and how to eat it. He is an economoist also, and a hater of waste.” Not only does The Author suggest appropriately lavish dinners, month by month, but also records famous dinners’ contents, and such oddities, as dinners inspired by Shakespeare!

Not in Bitting. Rare.



EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE NUT
20) FULLER, Andrew S. The Nut Culturist; A Treatise on The Propagation, Planting and Cultivation of Nut-Bearing Trees and Shrubs adapted to The Climate of The United States, with The Scientific and Common Names of The Fruit Known in Commerce as Edible or Otherwise Useful Nuts. New York, Orange Judd Company, 1908 228

8vo. Original dark green cloth, spine titled in gilt; viii + pp. 289 (+ 8pp. detailed related adverts. at rear), with a lithographed portrait frontispiece, after an original engraving, and no fewer than 107 wood-engraved plates and illustrations in text; mint condition inside and out, bar slight shadow from previous piece of loosely-inserted newsprint affecting verso of title, and first page of “Preface” only, leaving this a splendid copy.

First edition. Nuts covered in detail include: “The Almond”; “The Beechnut”; “Castanopsis”; “The Chestnut”, “Filbert or Hazelnut”, “Hickory Nuts”, and “The Walnut.”

LOCAL MALAYAN COOKERY
21) HING, Susie (Mrs.). In a Malayan Kitchen. Singapore, Mun Seong Press, [1956] 168

8vo. Original crimson cloth-backed bright yellow boards, titled in black on upper cover, surmounted by a steaming bowl, with 4 roundels containing the faces of the different races of “housewife”, for whom the book caters, East to West, pictorial advertising endpapers; pp. 99, with a wood-engraved frontispiece contrasting “The Old Type of Chinese Kitchen, with “The Modern Type of Chinese Kitchen”, a wood-engraved plate of the various utensils needed, and copious illustrations of local branded foodstuffs throughout; well-nigh immaculate condition inside and out, bar the traces of some removed sellotape, front and rear, where presumably manuscript recipes have been removed.

First edition. Preface: “One of the most attractive things about living in Malaya is its many and varied races ... This is just as true of Cookery as it is of other interests. I have included Chinese, Malay, Javanese, and Indian Recipes, as well as a few recipes of European Cakes and Desserts ... My thanks are due to Lady T.P.F. McNiece for so graciously consenting to write the foreword to my book..”

One copy only: BL.

22)HOLLAND, Mrs. Mary. The Complete Economical Cook, and Frugal Housewife; An Entirely New System of Domestic Cookery, containing Approved Directions for Purchasing and Cooking. Also, Trussing & Carving; Perparing soups, Gravies, Sauces, Made Dishes, Potting, Pickling, &c. With Directions for Pastry and Confectionery. Likewise the Art of Making British Wines, Brewing, Baking, &c. Printed for Thomas Tegg, 1838 228

Large 12mo. Original embossed brown embossed cloth, the covers with an all-embracing strapwork design, the rounded spine titled in gilt at head (“Domestic Cookery by Mrs. Holland”); xlviii + pp. 49-432, with a fine engraved frontispiece of “The Cook in His Kitchen”, surrounded by utensils and ingredients piled high, additional title with a substantial vignette of a Thatched Farmhouse and Yard, complete with Domestic Animals, Beehives, etc., an engraved “Table Setting” for “First” and “Second Course”, each involving 10 plates, and 3 diagrammatic plates of various roasts, showing how the various points for “Carving” and “Trussing”; light rubbing to head and foot of spine, while internally, well-nigh immaculate, bar light spotting at front and rear, this is a very good copy of a comprehensive cookery book that is missing from 2 of the best-known culinary bibliographies.

Fourteenth edition, “Considerably amended and enlarged, the result of thirty years’ practice.” Preface: “If cookery has been worth studying, as a sensual gratification, it is surely much more so as a means of securing one of the greates of human blessings - good health.” So comments the preface to this excellent collation of recipes, bills of fare, and food preparations, as well as sections at rear on “Brewing” and “British Wines.” Contemporary ownership inscription on front free-endpaper: “Anne Cox”.

cf. Cagle 752:“Bitting notes a “6th edition”of 1830”; NOT IN VICAIRE.

A JOLLY ANANACHRONISM, NOW 50 YEARS OLD
23) MACKENZIE, Compton. Sublime Tobacco [A Celebration]. Chatto and Windus, 1957 228

8vo. Original tan cloth, spine titled in gilt; [x] + pp. 352, with a collotype frontispiece aftre an original engraving of an “American Indian Village, 1590”, showing “Communal Tobacco Plots”, etc., 7 other similar related plates; well-nigh immaculate inside and out.

First edition. This is a defiantly pro-smoking tract, as seen in The Preface: “If a doctor should declare that I must either give up smoking or give up drinking alcohol for the rest of my life, I should reply without a moment’s hesitation and with the austerity of a stoic: “Then I renounce wine and spirits and will drink nothing but water for the rest of my life. I will never renounce my Pipe, and Whenever anybody offers me a Cigar, I shall accept that Cigar with gratitude and Smoke it with pleasure. My Yearly Resolution on New Year’s Eve shall be Not to Give up Smoking in The New Year.

FINE COPY OF THE RARE FIRST AUSTRALIAN COOKERY BOOK

24)MACLURCAN, Hannah. Mrs. Maclurcan’s Cookery Book; A Collection of Practical Recipes Specially Suitable for Australia. Townsville [Australia], [Privately Printed for The Author by] T. Wilmett & Sons., 1895. 595

8vo. Original black pebbled cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover; [iv] + pp.260 (+ unused “Memorandum” sheets at rear, and no fewer than 40pp. of local advertisements for all manner of food, drink, and hostelry); slight scuffing to lower board edges and foot of spine, but internally immaculate, this is an excellent example of the first expansion of the first Australian cookery book.

Second “Revised and Enlarged” edition. As “The Queenslander” put it in a review of Maclurcan’s first edition: “Housekeepers for a long time have been wanting a Cookery Book adapted to Colonial resources. The book we have for review will meet all these wants and is written by one of the best cooks in Australia, Mrs. Maclurcan, Queen’s Hotel, Townsville”. No fewer than 12 other local newspapers pour acclaim on her book. Among the recipes that will seem familiar to European readers, such examples as “Jugged Wallaby”; “Barramundi a la Normandie” and “Pawpaw Preserve” stand out as strictly local fare! Mrs. Maclurcan adds to her worth by including 20pp. of suggested “Menus”), a selection of “Household Hints”, and finally, suggestions for maintaining cleanliness, and a pure complexion: “An equal quantity of lemon juice and rose water and glycerine, mixed with the white of an egg (which has been previously beaten up) removes sunburn and freckles and renders the skin soft and delicate.”

NOT IN BITTING. RARE.


A DELIGHTFUL LITTLE IRISH ANGLING GUIDE
25)MATSON, Walter J. Salmon & Trout Fishing in Ireland; The Angler’s Pocket-Book and Guide. Dublin, Browne & Nolan, 1910. 228
Large 12mo. Original blue cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, the upper cover incorporating a substantial gilt vignette of a fisherman wrestling with some large prey; vii + pp. 199 (+ 8pp. detailed and related adverts, incorporating vignettes), with 6 fine mounted coloured plates of flies, and a folding tinted engraved map of Ireland, “Showing The Fishery Districts, with The Numbers corresponding to Those Shown in The Calendar”; small dint to fore-edges of covers, and minimal spotting to fore-edges, but otherwise, this remains avery good copy of this excellent local angling guide.
First edition. Preface: “In this book, I have aimed at giving such information as the angler may require, not only as regards where to fish in Ireland, but also as to how he can most readily and conveniently reach any particular resort ...” The author goes on: “I wish to thank Messrs. Hardy of Alnwich, to whom I am much indebted for their kind help in securing the three-colour reproduction of Salmon and Trout Flies ...”

Not in Fitzgerald Hampton. Rare.

26)MOFFAT, A.S. The Secrets of Angling [A Comprehensive Guide to Fishing - and to Cooking - Salmon and Trout, and All The Equipment Required]. Edinburgh, Adam & Charles Black, 1865. 298

8vo. Original dark green cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, in both cases surmounting a gilt roundel of intertwined fishes, burgundy endpapers; [xii] + pp. 326, with a detailed wood-engraved title vignette of a fisherman, a segmented gilt “reel” printed on the front free-endpaper (“Key to The Secrets or How to Angle ... The Figures Indicate The Pages where The Subjects are Treated”), and 27 wood-engraved illustrations in text of rods and tackle, specific to different rods and prey; light rubbing to extremities, while internally, there is a light sprinkling of spots to the title, and a small dint to the title and front free-endpaper, but otherwise, this is a very good copy of a detailed appreciation.

First edition. Not only are there individual chapters on necessary equipment, The Trout, and The Salmon, and copious anecdotes, but also, separate sections on “Minnow-Fishing”; “Night-Fishing”; “Cad-Bait and Maggot-Fishing”, and among the various cooking techniques described at rear, are methods for “Potting, Preserving, and Kippering Trout”: “Salmon, I need scarcely say, may be disposed of in a similar manner, whenver the sportsman is fortunate enough to get hold of them.”

Westwood & Satchell p.



AN AMAZING STORY!

27)NEWALL, Captain J.T. Scottish Moors and Indian Jungles: Scenes of Sport in The Lews and India. Hurst and Blackett, Limited, 1889. 398

8vo. Recent crimson half morocco, spine gilt in 6 compartments, titled in 2, incorporating a dark green morocco label, titled in gilt, 4 other compartments with alternating centrally-placed gilt motifs of a Trumpeting Elephant, and a Stag, raised bands, top edges gilt; [x] + pp. 320 (+ 14 pp. detailed publishers’ booklist), with a fine wood-engraved frontispiece and 11 other wood-engraved plates; immaculate condition inside and out, making this an extremely handsome copy of one of Newell’s rarer sporting works.

First edition. Printed on Fine Paper. The division between the 2 regions described in the title can be seen from a selection of illustrations: “Stalk of The Ten Pointer”; “The First Woodcock of The Season. Loch Roag”; “Hog Hunting - My First Charge. The Deccan”; “Bear-Shooting in The Ghauts - Taken Unawares”; and “Our First Tiger. Guzerat.” Czech: “Newall divides his time between stalking Red Deer, Grouse Shooting and Angling for Salmon in Scotland, with Hunts for Tiger, Bear, Wild Boar, and Other Game in India. There is also Note of Pig-Sticking.” Chute: “The first part is on Shooting, Fishing and Stalking on The Moors, with a Chapter on Fishing in Devon. The second part is on Big Game Shooting.” Amazingly, the author continued to hunt, even after breaking his back falling from a horse and being “Paralysed in The Lower Limbs”! Read on: “With regard to the poles, I fully succeeded. With one man in The Shafts, so to speak, in front, and one similarly placed behind, with 2, one on each side, to assist the latter, he having the principal weight, I can manage to ascend High Hills, and get carried to places and over ground which would have ben quite inaccessible to a Pony. [In this way], I shoot over dogs, and even Stalk Deer with success, though of course, it is shooting under difficulties”!

Czech p. 148; Chute 469.

A POWERFUL ATTACK ON OPIUM, PRINTED IN CALCUTTA

28) [OPIUM] ANON. The Consumption of Opium in India. A Critique of The Memorandum Presented by Sir William Roberts, M.D., F.R.S., as Medical Member of The Late Royal Commission on Opium. Calcutta: Office of the Indian Medical Record, 150 Dharamtala Street, 1895 395

Large 12mo. Original turquoise stapled wrappers, titled printed in black, contained in a specially-constructed black cloth fall-down-back box, with crimson calf label, titled in gilt: “Opium in India”, and dated in gilt at foot: “Calcutta 1895”; pp. 51; infinitesimal rubbing and wrinkling to wrappers, but internally immaculate, this is an excellent survival of a controversial little pamphlet on the subject.

First separately printed edition, “Reprinted, after Revision, from “The Indian Medical Record”.” This is a powerful and lucid rebuttal of any attempt to downplay the deleterious effects of Opium Consumption. It had been implied that Opium had a similar effect to Tea or Coffee drinking; the editor here begs to differ: “It is a striking instance in point that China, an Opium Consuming Nation, falls defeated and demoralised before Japan, an anti-opium nation, numerically seven times its inferior!”


HOW TO COOK FISH
29) “PISCATOR” [HUGHES, William]. A Practical Treatise on The Choice and Cookery of Fish. By Piscator. Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1854. 598

8vo. Original mottled burgundy cloth, upper cover with a centrally-placed gilt vignette, showing a trio of “landed” fish, spine titled in gilt; iv + pp. 291 (+ 24pp. detailed publisher’s booklist at rear, and with further booklists, “Books of General Utility”, and “Books for Young Persons”, printed on the front and rear pastedowns); well-nigh immaculate inside and out, bar the usual slight discoloration of endpapers, leaving this as good a copy as one could hope for of this rare cookery book.
“Second edition” - in fact, the first edition with this title - a work with similar subject matter had been published by the author in 1843. Preface: “Even in the very best of these [cookery] books, a great number of our most common and useful fishes are omitted altogether; whilst others are slightly glossed over, little being said about the edible merits, or by what particular mode of cookery they may be turned to the most profitable advantage. As a proof of this, we have searched in vain for something about the qualities of the John Dory, which, although one of the best fishes the sea has produced, is altogether unnoticed; nor can we find the Ling - a very common, and yet one of the most useful fishes taken upon our coasts - spoken of otherwise than as dried salt fish ... And we shall afford all the the information we can collect as to the various ways in which each individual species may be cooked, so as to appear at table to the greatest possible advantage.”

cf. Bittting p. 593; Cagle 765; Simon 1183.



A FINE COPY IN ITS DUST-JACKET
30) PITMAN, Capt. C.R.S. A Game Warden among His Charges. Nisbet & Co., Ltd., bvc [1931] 327

Original green cloth, spine titled in gilt, with the original orange dust-jacket, titled in green; xvi + pp. 336, with a fine photographic frontispiece of “Edmund Heller’s Giant Gorilla from Mt. Sabinio”, 24 other excellent captioned photographic plates, and a folding Lithographed Map of Uganda at rear; some slight uniform fading to covers, and darkening to spine of dust-jacket, slightly percolating to cloth beneath, but internally immaculate, this is a very good copy of one of Pitman’s most sought-after titles.

First edition. Czech: “The Author examines a variety of Game while relating his Hunting Experiences after Rhinoceros, Elephant near The River Kerio south of Lake Rudolf, Lion in Uganda, and with long Chapters on Gorillas and Crocodiles: “In shooting a Crocodile, no mater of which species, the Safest Shot is at The Neck ..”

Czech p. 131.



THE “FIRST SOUTHERN COOKBOOK” (BITTING)
31)RANDOLPH, Mrs. Mary. The Virginia Housewife: Or, Methodical Cook. Philadelphia, E.H. Butler & Co., 1846 298

8vo. Original burgundy morocco-backed original printed boards, title printed in black on the upper cover, with publisher’s booklist printed on the lower cover; xii + pp. 13-180; binding heavily rubbed and stained, but holding, while internally only intermittent light spotting, and marginal marking, this remains a good and solid copy of a pioneering work of American Cuisine.

Previous owner's date of "1844" at head of Introduction. An historic cook book containing traditional Virginia and other southern dishes. This is probably the earliest "Southern regional" cook book published and is an authoritative source for Virginia, and coastal Southern cuisine of the period. It includes Recipes for Sweetbread and Oyster Pie, Milk Rice, Vinegars, Preserves, Creams, Turtle Soup (including directions for “Cleaning a Whole Turtle”) as well as “Mock Turtle Soup” (from a Calf's Head!), Condiments, Pickles, Beverages (Hot and Cold), Shrubs, and many other foods and preparations of the early American South. The author Mary Randolph was born to a “Society” family in Virginia (1762-1828), and Ran a fashionable boarding house in Richmond. She wrote this book as a record of her own Recipes, and those of her acquaintances and family.

Bitting p. 388; Lowenstein 152.


AN EXTENSIVE LITTLE HERBAL
32) ROBINSON, Matthew. The New Family Herbal: Comprising a Description, and The Medical Virtues of British and Foreign Plants, Founded on The Works of Eminent Modern English and American Writers on The Medical Properties of Herbs: To Which is Added, The Botanical Family Physician; Valuable Medical Receipts; and Important Directions Regarding Diet, Clothing, Bathing, Air, Exercise, &c., &c., W. Nicholson & Sons, Limited, [n.d.] 228

Small 8vo. Original burgundy cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, surmouting on the upper cover a spray of flowers blocked in blind, while the spine has an elaborate gilt and blind design incorporating another spray of flowers interspersed with the title: “Robinson’s New Family Herbal, Comprising a Description of The Medical Properties and THe Mode of Using British and Foreign Herbs with Engravings of 130 Plants, Also The Botanic Family Physician”; pp. 480, with an elegant floriate lithographed additional title and frontispiece, both blocked in rose-pink, and 24 chromolithographed botanical plates, each with multiple images; immaculate condition inside and out, making this a highly desirable copy of an extensive little herbal.

(?) First edition. Robinson is forward-looking for his time, arguing for an eradication of superstition and myth, in the analysis of the benefits of Herbal Medicine: “The government of Herbs by The Sun, The Moon, and The Stars has been exploded by Modern Science; and is now regarded by persons of ordinary capacity to be absurd in the extreme. Botanical knowledge has been greatly augmented of late years. The properties of Herbs, by scientific study , and by Medical Experience, are now better understood than they were in the days of Culpeper and others. The Botanic system of Medicine is making rapid progress, [and] it would be the greatest folly to perpetuate the ignorance and absurdities of ancient Herbalists.”



LIMITED EDITION HERBAL, WITH BIBLIOGRAPHY
33) ROHDE, Eleanour Sinclair. The Old English Herbals [including an Important Bibliography]. The Minerva Press, 1972

4to. Original tan buckram, titled in gilt at head of spine; title in black, with a centrally-placed vignette, blocked in crimson, of an orchard in full bloom, xii + pp. 243 [including a 54pp. detailed Bibliography of Early Herbals at rear, of Manuscript, English and Foreign Herbals], with an evocative frontispiece after a 12th century copy of “The Herbal of Apuleius”, showing “Herbs being Dug Up and Made into Medicines under The Direction of a Sage”, and 17 other plates after frontispieces, etc. of iconic herbals; immaculate condition inside and dout.

Limited edition, number 100 of 500 copies only, with wide margins. Preface: “No pains have been sparted to make the bibliographies as complete as possible ...”



34)RUNDELL, Maria Eliza. A New System of Domestic Cookery; Formed upon Principles of Economy, and Adapted to The Use of Private Families. By a Lady. With The Addition of Many New Receipts. Halifax, Milner and Sowerby, 1853. 228

8vo. Original crimson cloth, flat gilt spine, elaborately tooled with an all-embracing design of gathered game, including hanging venison, gamebirds, fish and fruit, the upper cover tooled with blind strapwork cornerpieces, encompassing a centrally-placed gilt vignette of a Fisher-Girl, displaying her wares; lii + pp. 350, with a fine steel-engraved frontspiece and additional title (“Domestic Cookery for The Use of Private Families”), and 9 wood-engraved plates on heavier paper stock, showing various cuts, etc. of various meats; neatly rebacked with the original spine laid down, externally very fresh and bright, bar a couple of tiny white flecks at foot of spine, and minimal rubbing to extemities, while internally, there are new endpapers, matching the old, and occasional light spotting, but overall, this remains an extremely attractive copy of a renowned and sought-after culinary work.

New edition. Preface: “The Mistress of a family should always remembere that the welfare and good management of the house depends on the eye of the superiorand consequently that nothing is too trifling for her notice, whereby waste may be avoided; and this attention is of more importance now that the price of every necessary of life is increased to an enormous degree”. This famous work, which ran into many editions, is renowned for introducing the world’s first published recipe for the “Scotch Egg”!

Cf. Bitting p. 410.


35) SENN, C. Hermann. The Art of The Table: Including How to Wait at Table; How to Fold Napkins and How to Carve. Ward, Lock & Co., Limited, 1923 127

8vo. Original light grey cloth, titled in black on spine and upper cover, surmounting on the upper cover a vignette of a Butler’s Tray, with Decanter, 3 Glasses, and a Bowl; pp. 128, with an evocative photographic frontispiece showing 2 Table Settings: “1. Supper Tables for a Hunt Ball” and “2. Table for an Elaborate Supper”, and 12 other full-page photographic plates in text, and illustrations throughout, both photographic and diagrammatic (napkin-folding, etc.); upper cover bumped at corner and foot, and a fleck of red ink to the head of the lower cover, but internally immaculate, this is a lovely crisp copy of an essential servants’ guide.

Third edition. Preface: “The term Service rightly embraces, besides actual Waiting, many other attendant arts. Not least among these is Carving. The art of carving is described and illustrated in the following pages in a manner at once clear and precise, detailed, and yet easy to comprehend. The important matter of Laying the Table is also considereed in all its details ... [Likewise,] another aspect of elegant table-laying is treated in the section devoted to Napkin Folding. Herein are shown a number of things an artistic waiter or waitress may do with a napkin, together with directions and diagrams for some of the prettiest and most modern designs ...”


A COMPLETE SET OF ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL CULINARY GUIDES.
36) SIMON, Andre. A Concise Encyclopaedia of Gastronomy; [with] Wines and Liqueurs from A-Z; [with] The Wine Conoisseur’s Catechism [THE COMPLETE SET], The Wine and Food Society, c. 1935-45. 328

8vo. 3 works. 11 vols. Original various coloured cloth bindings, with dust-jackets; or Original wrappers (as issued); c. 1000 pages; slight fraying to head of vol. III (Vegetables), but otherwise well-nigh immaculate inside and out, the whole, contained in a specially-constructed black cloth fall-down-back box, with crimson cloth labels (“Andre Simon on Gastronomy and Fine Wines”).
FIRST EDITIONS.

37) SOAMES, Peter. A Treatise on The Manufacture of Sugar from The Sugar Cane. E. & F.N. Spon, 1872. 228

Tall 8vo. Original burgundy cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover; viii + pp. 136, with a folding wood-engraved frontispiece “High Pressure Gothic Portable Beam Engine and Sugar Mill”, with tissue-guard, and 6 other folding wood-engraved plates, 5 at rear, and copious illustrations throughout; spine slightly chipped at head, but otherwise well-nigh immaculate inside and out.

First edition. Preface: “In issuing this treatise upon the Practical Manufacture of Sugar in The Colonies, we beg to mention that it is almost entirely the result of experience gained both in The West and East Indies during the last 20 years ... We trust that the designs [machinery] that we veture to place before our readers, may be of sufficient use to enable them to produce a first-class sugar”.

38) [STEPHEN, John.] A Treatise on The Manufacture, Imitation and Reduction of Foreign Wines, Brandies, Rums, Etc., Etc. Including “Old Rye” Whiskey, “Old Rye Monongahela”, “Wheat”, and “Bourbon” Whiskeys, Fancy Brandies, Cordials, and Domestic Liquors. Based on The “French System”. Philadelphia, for The Author, 1860 228

8vo.

Making wine is the main focus of this book but we are also shown how to make good imitations of scotch whiskey or Irish whiskey or bourbon.

Gabler 38040; Amerine & Borg 3330. Not in Bitting. Rare.



39) [TAMIL COOKERY] “THE LADIES’ COMMITEE F.I.N.S. WOMEN’S WORKSHOP”. A Friend in Need English-Tamil Cookery Book. Madras, The Diocesan Press, Vepery, 1938 228

8vo. Original brown cloth-backed brown yellow and white boards, the upper cover with the image of a Flamboyant Tamil Waiter carrying a Large Steaming Pie, by I.R. Warre; iv + pp. 332, with a splendid frontispiece, also by Warre, showing the lady of the house losing much of her instruction, through mis-translation by an “intermediary”: “We [The Compilers of The Book] claim that it will place the mistress in direct communication with The Cook, and enable The Cook to understand his instructions first hand.” (Preface).

Second (“enlarged” and “corrected”) edition. Preface: “Readers may feel that they are getting something that should effect and enormous saving in time, money, nervous energy and indigeston.” The predominantly British fare is described in detail in both English and Tamil to help prevent communication breakdown between a mistress and her cook in Madras and other Tamil speaking areas.The Friend-in-Need Society provided a home for the destitute Europeans and Anglo-Indians in Madras.




A UNIQUE COPY, EXTRA-ILLUSTRATED, AND ANNOTATED BY AUTHOR AND RECIPIENT
40)TEGETMEIER, W.B. Pheasants: Their Natural History annd Practical Management. Horace Cox, 1897. 898

8vo. Original black cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, contained in a black specially-constructed box, with burgundy leather labels and silk tie, titled in gilt, and further containing a separate integral flapcase, containing related papers and correspondence; [xii] + pp. 237 (+ 2pp. publisher’s notices and associated book listings at rear), with a collotype frontispiece of a Prince of Wales Pheasant by J. Smit, and 15 other plates by Tegetmeier, wood-engraved illustrations; spine neatly repaired at joints, and some occasional very light soiling internally, leaving this an extremely good and unique copy of this highly important treatise on The King of The Game Birds.

Third edition, enlarged”. Inscribed on the front free-endpaper: “J.E. Harting with the sincere regards, J.W. Tegetmeier. July 1897.” This is an amazing an unique copy of this renowned, and much reprinted work on the pheasant. What makes it extraordinary is the sheer volume of material that has been added by Harting, subsequent to his receipt of it from the author! In fact, so much was added that the book was splitting at the joints, and it was considered sensible to have the box built, incorporating a flapcase for additional material. This comprises everything from neatly clipped advertisements for helpful sporting equipment (“non-straying mixture”, etc.), through inscribed pamphlets, to personal “letters to the editor”, several incorporating drawings, or photographs to illustrate various sporting points - items covered include incidents of “Pheasants Flying Through Windows”; “A Pheasant’s Attempt to Fly Across Loch Ness”; “A Pheasant’s Nest Found in A Squirrel’s Drey”, and “Fifteenth Century Pheasant Rearing”. There are copious insights given on the effects of The Fox on Pheasants and Partridges. The majority of these clippings and letters have been tipped in opposite their relevant passages of text. Of particular interest, there are 2 autograph letters, signed, one by the ornithological illustrator F.W. FROHAWK, discussing, and illustrating a patent bird-scarer; the other by LORD LILFORD, and illustrated by an original photograph, discussing the incident of a pheasant nesting in a tree, and the detrimental effect on its brood. Anker: “This favourite book, to whose popularity a number of editions testify. The different sections of the work deal with The Natural History of Pheasants, their Management in Preserves and in Confinent, and the Diseases of these birds; they also describe all the different species adapted to The Covert and The Aviary.”

Anker 500.

41)TIMBS, John. Club Life of London, with Anecdotes of The Clubs, Coffee-Houses and Taverns of The Metropolis During The 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries. Richard Bentley, Publisher in Ordinary to Her Majesty, 1866. 328

8vo. 2 vols. Original navy blue cloth, spines titled in gilt, inside floriate gilt cartouches, ribbed covers tooled in blind; xii + pp. 324, and xi + pp. 320, with fine engraved frontispieces, of Captain Charles Norris by W. Greatbach, “from the Original Picture in the Possession of the Family”, and of George Colman, The Elder, after the original by Joshua Reynolds; minimal darkening to spines, with the gilt still bright, and light rubbing to extemities, while internally the frontispieces are lightly spotted, with slight offsetting to the titles, however remaining in fine and tight original condition, leaving this an extremely handsome set of this important collation.

First edition. Preface: “Few attempts have been made to focus the Club-Life of periods, or to assemble with reasonable limits, the histories of the leading Associations of Clubbable men - of Statesmen and Politicians, Wits and Poets, Authors, Artists, and Actors, and “Men of`Wit and Pleasure”, which the town has presented since the days of The Restoration; or in more direct succession, and from The Reign of Queen Anne, and the days of The Tatler and Spectator, and other Essayists in their wake. The present Work aims to record this Club-life, in a series of sketches of the leading Societies ...” Clubs featured include such famous ones as “The Kit-Kat”; “Brooke’s”, “Boodle’s”, and “White’s”, not to mention, “The Oxford and Cambridge”, amongst others equally renowned. Engraved bookplate of George Montgomery Traherne.

42)TYACKE, Lieut.-Col. R.H. In Quest of Game: A Sportsman’s Manual for Game Shooting in Kulu, Lahoul and Ladak to The Tso Morari Lake. With Notes on Shooting in Spiti, Bara, Bagahal, Chamba and Kashmir, and A Detailed Description of Sport in More Than 130 Nalas. Calcutta and Simla, Thacker, Spink & Co., 1927. 598

Small 8vo. Original crimson cloth, titled in black on spine and upper cover, publishers’ art nouveau floral endpapers; x + pp. 202, with 8 large folding maps of the various areas; a nice brigh copy, affected only by a small black spot to the upper cover, and slight bumping to the upper outer corners, leaving this a very good copy of an excellent little guide to the sporting potential in the region.

First edition, revised. Contemporary review: “Those who wish to shoot in The Kangra District, or right up to Ladakh, could not do better than to get that interesting and well-written little book by Colonel Tyacke, the most practical work ever penned by a Himalayan sportsman” (cf. “The Guide to Dharmsala, etc.” by J. Fitzgerald Lee). This edition contains approximately 70 more pages than the 1893 first edition, and has an extra map (of Chamba). It is a superbly useful little book with well-drawn maps, most of which include routes which are described in detail in the text. This is a scarce work, originally provided for the use of officers with three months leave.The initial section gives general information (useful hints, camps, game laws) and the remaining sections deal with each of the areas in turn giving suggested routes, notes on game, local people, etc. Czech: “Tyacke includes numerous episodes of his own hunting experiences as well as sporting expeditions with his wife [cf. “How I Shot My Bears” by Mrs. Tyacke (1893).”

Yakushi T 145b (has this edition only); cf. Czech p. 217 (1893 ed. only).



A SPLENDID LITTLE VOLUME

43) “A VETERAN OF SMOKEDOM” The Smoker’s Guide, Philosopher and Friend; What to Smoke-What to Smoke with-and the Whole “What’s What” of Tobacco, Historical, Botanical, Manufactural, Anecdotal, Social, Medical, &c., &c., &c., Hardwicke & Bogue, 1876 128

Small 8vo. Original green cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, surmounting, on the upper cover, a substantial gilt vignette blocked in gilt and black, of a Cross-Legged and Turbanned Eastern Character, smoking a Hookah; [viii] + pp. 184, with a wood-engraved frontispiece of “Tobacco Plants”, with tissue-guard; light rubbing to extremities, while internally only a very light sprinkling of spots, leaving this a delightful copy of this little anachronistic celebration of the joys of tobacco, and its products.

First edition. Preface: “The invention of smoking is one of the most remarkable events in the history of mankind. It seems to be more or less connnected with man’s religious instincts. Smoke, Fume, or Perfume of some sort, from the earliest times was an emblem of divine satisfaction. The pagan gods were supposed to sniff and delight in the fume of sacrifice ... and not only was the fume of something burnt offered up in order to please the god whom he worshipped, but man also burnt it to please himself ... one fact is certain - Tobacco came upon civilised man as a conquering hero.”





FAMOUS LIBEL LAWYER’S COPY, INSCRIBED BY THE AUTHOR
44)WENTWORTH-DAY, J. The Dog in Sport. Geoge G. Harrap & Co., 1938. 248

8vo. Original dark green cloth, spine titled in gilt, surmounting a gilt vignette of a greyhound; pp.320, with a fine photographic frontispiece of “Miss J. Wykeham-Musgrave’s Field Trial Champion Spaniel Poodle “Crinkle” retrieving a Rabbit over a Stone Wall”, and 37 other photographic plates on 29 leaves; immaculate condition inside and out, apart from a light spott ot he foot of the upper cover, leaving this an excellent and tight copy of a splendid book, with an illustrious provenance.

First edition. Presentation copy, inscribed in ink on the front free-endpaper to the famous libel lawyer: “Peter F. Carter-Ruck from The Author. Jim Wentworth-Day. 1945”, and further signed by the author on the title. Preface: “The Dog is not merely The Servant, but The Friend, The Fellow-Sportsman, The Sharer in man’s most primitive and masculine delights. I have tried in these chapters to give pictures of days which I have known in the still unspoiled places of that older, lovelier England which lingers stubbornly where no factory smoke stains the upper air. There is, thank God, plenty of it still. And in those precious memories, a common heritate to most of us, The Dog was our partner.” This a wonderful book, written with great brio, about “Man’s Best Friend”, and his unique relationship with us.



A CAUTIONARY TALE, BUT INTERSPERSED
WITH SOLID ADVICE ON A GOOD DIET

45) [WHITING, Sydney]. The Memoirs of A Stomach. Written by Himself that All who Eat may Read. Edited by a Minister of The Interior. W.E. Painter, [1854] 228

8vo. Original grass-green cloth, titled in gilt on upper cover, above a gilt vignette of a libation cup, with Classical motifs, reprised in blind on the lower cover, and floriate cornerpieces to both covers; xvi + pp. 9-135 [identical pagination to Bitting’s cited copy of the 6th edition], with an excellent satirical engraved frontispiece, showing the Nightmare being Experienced by a Bloated Individual, surrounded by the Maelstrom of Foodstuffs careering about in his Innards, and an excellent title vignette, depicting a Fantastic Struggle between a Mythic “Sentry of The Stomach”, fighting off several Demons of Indigestion; well nigh immaculate inside and out, this is a very good copy of A Splendid Expose of The Gourmand.

Fourth edition (“Revised, with Additions”). This is a Fanciful Account of The Digestive Process, apparently written by a Medical Man, with passages in Verse and Dialogue. The Author considers the Care and Treatment of The Stomach, and includes a Number of Prescriptions for Digestive Ailments. Bitting: “Vicaire cites a French translation by Dr. C.H. Gros, 3rd edition, reviewed and augmented, 1876.”

Bitting p. 578; cf. Vicaire.














A SPECTACULAR COMPENDIUM OF USEFUL INFORMATION
1) ANONYMOUS. Valuable Secrets Concerning Arts and Trades: Or, Approved Directions, from The Best Artists, for The Various Methods of Engraving on Brass, Copper, or Steel; Of the Composition of Metals; Of the Compostion of Varnishes; Of Mastichs, Cements, Sealing-Wax, &c. &c.; Of the Glass Manufactory. Various Imitations of Precious Stones, and French Paste; Of colours and Painting, Sueful for Carriage Painting, Useful for Carriage Painters; Of Painting on Paper; Of Compositions for Limners; Of Transparent Colours; Colours to Dye Skins or Gloves; To Colour or Varnish Copper-Plate Prints; Of Painting on Glass; Of Colours of All Sorts, for Oil, Water, and Crayons; Of Preparing the Lapis Lazuli to Make Ultramarine; Of the Art of Gilding; The Art of Dying Woods, Bones, &c.; The Art of Casting in Moulds; Of Making Useful sorts of Ink; The Art of Making Wines; Of the Compositions of Vinegars; Of Liquors, Essential Oils, &c.; Of the Confectionary Business; The Art of comparing Snuffs; Of taking out Spots and Stains; Art of Fishing, Angling, Bird-Catching, &c.; And subjects Curious, Entertaining, and Useful. Containing upwards of One Thousand approved Receipts relative to Arts and Trades. Dublin, by James Williams, 1778. 528

Later sprinkled calf (in “the old style”, over marbled boards, with slightly raised bands, spine gilt in 5 compartments, 4 with a centrally-placed gilt flower-head emblem, the fifth with a burgundy calf label titled in gilt, marbled endpapers, all edges yellow; xxvii + pp. 312; well-nigh immaculate condition inside and out, bar occasional light markings, leaving this a splendid copy of a wonderful early Irish “printed commonplace book”.

First edition. Loosely-inserted is a 1952 ALS by the bookdealer, W.D. John of Newport, Monmouth, to a “Mrs. Bertram K. Liddle of Brookline, Mass.”, discussing a 1688 edition of a work entitled “The Arts Treasure of Rarities and Curious Inventions”, possibly seen as an earlier form of this work? In the “Preface” to this edition, “The Editor” describes the book as having a French route: “It is but of a late date since those arts and trades which constitute the wealth and the commerce of Great Britain, were overlooked, despised, and ranked as inferior conditions. Through the gloom of ignorance, they now begin to increase their lustre, economical order, and necessary distribution, in this great kingdom.” Interestingly, loosely-inserted in this copy is a 1952 ALS by the bookdealer, “W.D. John of Newport, Monmouth”, to a “Mrs. Bertram K. Liddle of Brookline, Mass.”, discussing a 1688 edition of a work entitled “The Arts Treasure of Rarities and Curious Inventions”, possibly seen as an earlier form of this work?

SUPERB HAND-COLOURED PLATES OF OUR EDIBLE MUSHROOMS
2)BADHAM, Charles David. A Treatise on The Esculent Fungi of England, containing An Account of Their History, Uses, Characters, Development, Structure, Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and Preserving, &c. Reeve, Brothers, 1847. 598

Tall 8vo. Contemporary full green calf, covers with multiple fillet borders in gilt and blind, spine gilt in 6 compartments, 5 with elaborate gilt floriate tooling, with a recent burgundy label at head, titled in gilt (“Edible Mushooms/Badham”), marbled endpapers; x + pp. 138, with an accurate engraved title vignette below the title, showing multiple species, 21 lithographed plates, of which 18 are finely hand coloured and finished with gum arabic varnish highlights; joints slightly tender, while internally, well-nigh immaculate, leaving this a very handsome copy of a classic work on mushrooms, and their culinary enticements.

First edition. Preface: “No country is perhaps richer in Esculent Funguses than our own; we have upwards of thirty species abounding in our woods. No markets might therefore be better supplied than the English, and yet England is the only country in Europe where this important and savoury food is from ignorance or prejudice, left to perish ungathered.” To encourage the naissant gatherer, the author encourages him with Mouth-Watering Recipes such as this for “Stuffed Morells [sic]”: “Choose the freshest and whitest Morells, open the stalk at the bottom; wash and wipe them well, fill with Veal Stuffing, Anchovy, or any rich farce you please, securing the ends, and dressing between thin slices of Bacon.”

Nissen BBI 126.






3) “BEE BOX”: WADEY, H.J. The Bee Craftsman; A Short Guide to The Life History and Management of The Honey-Bee. Petts Wood, Kent, A.G. Smith, 1945. 165

and a quantity of others (pamphlets) on BEES, and 2 further books, one in the same series - “Bees and Honey” by George A. Carter (1946)- both with dust-jackets, ALL contained in a specially constructed green cloth fall-down back box, with crimson leather labels, and green silk pull tag, titled in gilt: “Bee: Pamphlets, etc.”.

The pamphlet titles comprise: Bee Hives (1964); Honey Extractors, Strainers and Bottling Tanks (1952); Beekeeping (1951); Diseases of Bees (1951); Honey from Hive to Market (1953 and 1963); Living with Varroa Jacobsoni (1992). The other book is “Swarming: Its Control and Prevention” by L.E. Snelgrove (1941).


DELUXE BINDING
4)BEETON, Isabella. The Book of Household Management, Comprising Information for The Mistress; Housekeeper; Cook; Kitchen-Maid; Butler; Footman; Coachman; Valet; Parlour-Maid; Butler; Footman; Coachman; Valet; Parlour-Maid; Housemaid; Lady’s-Maid; General Servant; Laundry-Maid; Nurse and Nursemaid; Monthly, Wet, and Sick-Nurse; Governess. Also Sanitary, Medical and Legal Memoranda. With a History of The Origin, Properties and Uses of All Things Connected with Home Life and Comfort. Ward, Lock and Co., 1889. 698

8vo. Original dark green cloth, lavishly blocked in gilt and black, with copious food-related vignettes, all edges gilt; xlvi (+ 2pp. coloured plate list) + pp. 1644, with 13 full-page coloured plates, 2 folding, copious black and white illustrations throughout; includes Chapters on Australian Cookery (Wallaby Roast, Parrot Pie, Kangaroo Tail Soup, etc.);

“Deluxe Binding”, “Entirely New Edition, Revised, Corrected and Greatly Enlarged, containing New Coloured Plates and Numerous Full-Page and Other Engravings. Several Hundreds of New Recipes for English, French, German, Italian, American, Australian and Indian Cookery, New Menus for Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners, Teas and Suppers with Much Valuable Information upon Household and Domestic Matters.” The standard great cookery book in unusually fine condition. Evening Standard: "A storehouse of knowledge which no woman who has her household to consider can afford to do without." Arthur Conan Doyle: "This book has more wisdom to the square inch than any work of man” This is a wonderful testimonial, when one remembers that the last edition thus praised contains more than 80,000 square inches of closely packed information. Of note is the inclusion of recipes for American and Colonial cuisines so that Britons living under other skies may learn how to combine the dishes of their adopted country with those of the Motherland."
cf. Bitting p. 32.



AMERICAN INDIAN HERBAL
5)BOWKER, Pierpont F. The [Mohawk] Indian Vegetable Family Instructer: Containing The Names and Descripitons of All The Most Useful Herbs and Plants that Grow in This Country, with Their Medicinal Qualities Annexed; Also A Treatise on Many of The Lingering Diseases to Which Mankind are Subject, with New and Plain Arguments respecting The Management of The Same; with A Large List of Recipes, which have been Carefully Selected from Indian Prescriptions and from Those Very Persons who were Cured by The Same after every other Remedy had Failed. Utica, by Jared Doolittle, 1851 327

12mo. Original black morocco-backed printed boards, titled and ruled into 4 compartments in gilt on spine, and titled in black on upper cover; pp. 180; some heavy rubbing to binding, but to the boards only, with some fading to printed title, and spine slightly holed at head, while internally there is some light spotting and browning throughout, but overall, this remains a good and tight little copy of an extremely rare American Indian Herbal.

Second edition (We know of one other edition, apparently printed in 1836). Pencil ownership inscription of Martha G. Dopp (of New York), born 1841. The book lists no fewer than 194 different plants, and their various curative effects, before moving on to list 176 recipes for making the solutions, tinctures and poultices from them.





POSSIBLY UNIQUE CLOTH BINDING –
BRILLAT-SAVARIN FOR THE BRITISH
6) [BRILLAT-SAVARIN] SIMPSON, Leonard Francis. The Handbook of Dining; Or, How to Dine Theoretically, Philosophically, and Historically Considered. Based Chiefly upon The “Physiologie du Gout” of Brillat-Savarin. Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, & Roberts, 1859 298

8vo. Original black embossed cloth, spine titled in gilt at head, and gilt tooled at head and foot, covers blocked with an all-embracing pattern of gold spots, tuscan-red endpapers; [xx] + pp. 244 (+ 24pp. detailed publishers’ booklist at rear); well-nigh immaculate inside and out, bar minimal fraying at foot, this is a splendid little culinary celebration is a highly unusual binding.

First edition. Preface: “Brillat-Savarin’s Maxims for Dining and Giving Dinners are now placed before The Amphitryons of London in “The Handbook of Dining”... No person can read through these pages without coming to the conclusion that Gastronomy is a science well worthy the study of persons of intellect of both sexes; and it will lead them to the conviction that A little more Study in the Selection of Their Dishes, The Management of Their Kitchen, and Due Attention to The Comfort of Their Guests, will Enhance Tenfold The Pleasure of The Table and will Make Their Dinners Select.” Multi-coloured engraved bookplate of renowned Collector on Gastronomy, Harry Schraemli.

Bitting p. 437.




A SOUGHT AFTER HERBAL AND ANALYSIS OF EDIBLE PLANTS AND FLOWERS
7)BRYANT, Charles (“of Norwich”). “Flora Diatetica”, or History of Esculent Plants, both Domestic and Foreign. In which They are Accurately Described, and Reduced to Their Linnaean Generic and Specific Names. With Their English Names Annexed and Ranged under Eleven General Heads, viz. 1) Roots; 2) Shoots, Stalks, &c.; 3) Leaves; 4) Flowers; 5) Berries; 6) Stone-Fruit; 7) Apples; 8) Legumens; 9) Grain; 10) Nuts; 11) Funguses. And a Particular Account of The Manner of Using Them; Their Native Places of Growth; Their Several Varieties, and Physical Properties: Together with Whatever is otherwise Curious, or Very Remarkable in Each Species. For B. White, at Horace’s Head, in Fleet Street, 1783. 598

8vo. Contemporary black half morocco, over marbled boards, with a later spine, entitled at head: “Bryant’s Esculent Plants”; xvi + pp. 379 (+ pp. 12 “indexes” of Latin and English Names at rear); neatly rebacked with a flat black calf spine, ruled in gilt in 6 compartments, and titled in the top one, while internally immaculate, leaving this an extremely desirable copy of one of the rarer works on comestibles come from the ground, and how to exploit them.

First edition. Preface: “Whether we view Mankind in a natural or civilised state, we shall find that the principal part of his daily food, and also most of the articles necessary to his comfortable enjoyment of Life, are drawn from the vegetable kingdom; every endeavour therefore to point out with precision and accuracy the Species of Plants, immediately adapted to teh use of man, must carry with ait its own recommendation.” Engraved armorial bookplate of Edward Duke. “Johannes Salberg’s rather cursory Latin thesis on food plants [“Fructus Esculenti”(1763)] and the prodding of a pharmacist friend [Rose] motivated Charles Bryant to work on a detailed, authoritative work for Gardeners, Cooks, and Gourmets ... The Fruit Chapters in his “Flora Diatetica” ... describe many species and some cultivars often at length, and comment on their taste” (cf. Janson, “Pomona’s Harvest”, p. 199).
Pritzel 1301; Stafleu & Cowan 858; BMNH I, 273; NOT IN HUNT.



SECRETS OF BRITISH WINE PRODUCTION

8)CARNELL, P.P.Q A Treatise on Family Wine Making: Calculated for Making Excellent Wines from The Various Fruits of This United Country; In Relation to Strength, Brilliancy, Health, and Economy; Explanatory of The Whole Process, and Every Other Requisite Guide after The Wine is Made and In The Cellar; Composed from Practical Knowledge and Written Expressly and Exclusively for Domestic Use, Containing Sixty Different Sorts of Wine. To Which is Subjoined The Description of Part of a Recent British Vintage, inclusive of An Interesting Experimental Lecture. Sherwood, Neely & Jones, Parternoster Row; Sold by T. Hookham, Jun. and Co., Old Bond-Street; Gossling, 308 Oxford-Street; Hatchard, Piccadilly; J. and G. Todd, York, 1814. 598

8vo. Original grey-blue boards, neatly rebacked, with a new paper label at head of spine, titled in black; [xviii] + pp. 19-158 (+ 2pp. contents leaf at rear, and 16pp. various detailed publishers’ adverts. at rear; upper cover slightly stained at upper outer corner, and some scuffing to lower board, edges rubbed, and occasional light spotting and dust-marking internally, but nevertheless, this remains a fine and unsophisticated copy of an important treatise.

First edition. Preface: “It is hoped that [Domestic Wine Makers] will lay aside all predjudice, follow the processes and precepts herein stated, and thereby enable themselves to make many generous and brilliant vernacular wines, as any imported from the continent: “To cleanse the cloudy front of wrinkled care; And dry the tearful sluices of despair.” Includes instructions for 60 different wines, from Red Gooseberry and Damson, to Ginger and Several Types of Mead.

SOHO CHINESE COOKERY

9) CHENG, S.K. Shanghai Restaurant Chinese Cookery Book. [Privately Printed], [1936] 168

8vo. Original crimson cloth, titled in black on the upper cover; [vi] + pp. 102, immaculate condition inside and out.

First edition. Preface: “All ingredients can be obtained from The Shanghai Emporium, 6 Greek Street, London W1. In the following pages we shall give a series of dishes such as would be supplied to a party of 8 persons so that the complete whole should be a well balanced dinner and give every satisfaction ...”

A GUIDE TO THE MOST POPULAR BEAN
10) [COFFEE] HAARER, A.E. (“District Agricultural Officer, Moshi”). A Planter’s Guide to the Production of Arabica Coffee. Dar es Salaam, The Government Printer, c. 1930

8vo. Originla cream wrappers, titled in black on the upper cover, inside a black border, stapled; pp. 31, with 9 lithographed illustrations in text of Coffee Plants at different stages of growth; well-nigh immaculate condition inside and out, this is a rare “Colonial” survival guide for this important crop.

First edition. Ownership stamp to upper wrapper of the “Trade Information Office” of “His Majesty’s Dependencies”. This is an essential “how-to” guide, covering everything from “First Steps in Planting”, through “Plantation Care and Improvement”, to a straight comparison between the different qualities of The Arabica varieties: “Bourbon”, “Nyasa”, “Java”, (and 2 varieties imported from India and planted) “Jackson” and “Kent”.




11)COOKE, Mordecai Cubitt. Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms: What to Eat and What to Avoid. SPCK, 1894 198

Sm. 8vo. Original grey cloth, the upper cover and spine blocked with multiple images of mushrooms, in full colour, titled in crimson on the upper cover; viii + pp. 126 (+ 8pp. publisher’s booklist at rear), with 18 fine high-tone chromolithographed plates, illustrating 40 species; some fading to spine title, and light rubbing to corners, while internally immaculate bar some fingering to the lower margins of B8 and C1, leaving this a very good copy of this essential guide.

First edition. Preface: “There are certainly some 70 or 80 common species to be found in this country which may be eaten with safety, but if only ten or twelve of these are well-known, they will furnish all the variety which an ordinary person will require ... We have ourselves eaten of more than 60 different species ... Persistent fungus-eaters never experiment on unknown species.” This is a fascinating and handsomely-produced little guide, by a renowned expert in the field.

Freeman 801.




A DELIGHTFUL COPY, WRITTEN FOR:
“THE LOVERS OF THE GASTRONOMIC ART”

12) CRAWFORD, Frances. French Cookery Adapted for English Families. Richard Bentley, 1853 598

8vo. Original grass-green cloth, titled in gilt on the spine, which has 3 elaborate gilt vignettes of a Brace of Game Birds, a Boar’s Head with an Apple in its Mouth, and with a Selection of Landed Fish, at head, yellow endpapers; xxviii + pp. 210; infinitesimal uniform fading to spine, with titles still very bright, and two tiny flecks of discoloration to lower cover, but overall this is an excellent tight copy of the extremely rare first edition.

First edition. Preface: “In order to render [the book] more useful, I have made every rule as plain and simple as it was possible. I have given the French names in most cases, because they are more generally known, and will, therefore, be better appreciated by The Lovers of The Gastronomic Art.” a splendid representative trawl through “French Cuisine” adapted for the English table, using only French titles (“Pate de Lievre”, etc.), with Soups and Sauces strongly represented. The book proved so popular that first and second edition appeared in the same year and a third edition appeared 2 years later. This book is very scarce, with only 2 copies of any edition appearing in the rooms in over 30 years. Only 5 copies of the second edition are recorded in UK and US libraries, and only 7 of the first edition. Ownership inscription to front free-endpaper: “Mrs. Jennings, Sept. 8th 1853. Boulogne sur Mer.”

Bitting p.105; Cagle 638.


RARE CRISPLY-WRITTEN CURRY COOK BOOK:
“NO HIGH AND MIGHTY GOBBLE-GOBBLE”
13) SANTIAGOE, Daniel (“General Servant, Son of Francis Daniel, Butler and Fiddler, Trichinopoly, Madras, India, and Colombo, Ceylon”). The Curry Cook’s Assistant; or Curries, How to Make Them in England in Their Original Style. Kegan Paul, Trench & Co., 1889 350

Small 8vo. Original crimson cloth-backed matching boards, titled in black on the upper cover, with relevant advertisements, to lower board; xx + pp. 80; mimimal discolouration of boards, and slight rubbing to extremities, but overall, this is a remarkable survival of a fragile piece of Colonial Cookery.

Third edition. Santiagoe was brought to England by John Loudoun Shand, who contributed “The Preface”, and for whom he worked as a “Gentleman’s Gentleman”. The book is written in a delightful broken English, but The Indian Recipes are absolutely solid, and include several for making Curry Powders - Those who are unable to find the ingredients are recommended to trust their grocer! Interestingly, the “Third” appears to be the only edition that ever turns up, although The Author says the first edition was in 500 copies. The Author was Ceylonese and describes himself on The Title as: "Son of Francis Daniel, Butler and Fiddler, Trichinopoly, Madras, India, and Colombo, Ceylon: Ceylon Tea House Waiter [at] Royal Jubilee Exhibition, Liverpool, 1887 [and] International Exhibition, Glasgow, 1888". A contemporary review in “Saturday Review” of October 22nd 1887, describes the book thus: “Nobody need think that Mr. Santiagoe is unintelligible. His English may be “pigeon”, but it is a much more easily digestible tongue than the high and mighty gobble-gobble of some of our own professors of style and matter.”

Not in Bitting or Cagle. 3 copies only in OCLC: Cornell, Radcliffe, and Wellcome; NUC adds NYPL; there is also a copy in the BL.




AN IMPORTANT GUIDE TO WINES AND SPIRITS
14)DAVIES, John. The Inkeeper and Butler’s Guide, or a Directory for Making and Managing British Wines; with Directions for The Managing, Colouring, and Flavouring of Foreign Wines and Spirits, and for Making British Compounds, Peppermint, Anniseed [[checkspelling], Shrub, etc. [Privately] Printed for and Sold by R. Davies, [n.d. but c. 1820]. 298

Large 12mo. Contemporary burgundy half calf, over marbled boards, flat spine ruled in gilt in 4 compartments, titled in one “The Butler’s Guide”; [iv] + pp. 199; some light rubbing to extremities of binding, and uniform light browning internally, but overall, despite this remains a very good and solid little copy of this fascinating book.

15th edition “Revised and Enlarged by His Son”. A Recipe book for making Inebriating Liquors! The part devoted to wine is divided into English and Foreign Wines. In the “English” section there are Recipes for Claret, Champagne, Port Sack, Raisin, Currant, Orange and Many Domestic Fruit Wines. The “Foreign” section includes Directions on the Managing of a Wine Vault; How to Correct Coloration, and Acidity, including "A Remedy for Claret that drinks foul." Sections on Beer and Cider making. Pages 182-191 contain "The Necessaries always wanted in Wine and Spirit Vaults and Gentlemen’s Cellars".

cf. Gabler p. 71; cf. Bitting p. 117 (8th edition only). Rare.


MUCH WIT AND LEARNING “NOT STUCK ON LIKE SUPERFLUOUS BAYLEAVES, WHICH GRACE A PYRAMID OF JELLY”!

15) DODS, Mistress Margaret (“of The Cleikum Inn, St. Ronans”). The Cook and Housewife’s Manual: A Practical System of Modern Domestic Cookery and Family Management; Containing a Compendium of French Cookery, and Of Fashionable Confectionery, Preparations for Invalids, a Selection of Cheap Dishes, and Numerous Useful Miscellaneous Receipts in The Various Branches of Domestic Economy. Edinburgh, Oliver & Boyd, and London, Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., 1842. 228
Crown 8vo. Original tan cloth, covers ruled in blind, covers ruled in blind, spine with a gilt cartouche at head, containing the title; pp. 491 (+ 1p. critical notices of previous editions); 2 or 3 worm holes to upper cover, and a tiny well-nigh immaculate inside and out, bar very occasional and minimal spotting or marking, leaving this a very good and solid copy of this renowned work of contemporary cuisine, and more.

Seventh edition. According to the advertisement printed at the front of this book, the “Comprehensive Treatise on Domestic Brewing, written expressly for this work”, has only just been added for this and subsequent editions. As a contemporary review from “The Scotsman” eloquently put it: “This book is evidently got up by some person who knows La Cuisine well, and something else besides - There are both wit and learning in it; and these not stuck on like the superfluous Bay Leaves which grace a Pyramid of Jelly, but entering, like well-prepared condiments, into its very substance - It is a handsome and most useful publication, and well deserves to be in the hands of every housewife in the kingdom.”

cf. Bitting p. 125.



PRIVATELY PRINTED “EMIRATES COOKERY”
16)[EMIRATES COOKERY] TARBUTTON, Hilda [and Others]. Favourite Recipes of Ras al Ham[ra]. [United Arab Emirates]. [Privately Printed (?) in The UEA], c.1945. 298

4to. Original pink wrappers, title printed boldly on the upper wrapper in black, incorporating a substantial black vignette of 2 Camels tethered beneath a Pair of Palm Trees, fronting a Sand Dune, beneath a Burning Sun, now contained in a specially-constructed black cloth fall-down-back box, with a crimson leather label to the spine, titled in gilt: “Emirates Cookery/Ras al Hamra”, and impressed: “Privately Printed”; pp. 226 (printed typescript on one side only), with a splendid lithographed additional title caricature by an unidentified artist, showing a Camel in a Chef’s Hat, sitting Cross-Legged and Stirring a Cooking Pot, while reading a Cook Book, and 5 others, each similarly fronting the various “Chapters” (“Soups and Appetizers”, “Main Courses”, “Desserts”, “Miscellaneous” and “Menus” - the “Miscellaneous” section, which is actually featured in the book, before the “Menus”, changing the sequence of the “Contents” leaf, is simply a further collection of both savoury and sweet dishes, some with the addition of alcohol(!); some fraying and abbrasion to the upper wrapper, affecting the final 2 letters of the title and the fore-edge, and a sprinkling of spots to the upper part, and minimal loss at the head of the spine, though the block is holding firm, leaving this what must be an extremely rare and impromptu selection of recipes collected at a very specific time and place.

First and Only edition. This would appear to be a collection of personal recipes collated from a truly international group of westerners “on station” in The Middle East. The only fully-identified major contributor is the above Hilda Tarbutton, coming from South Texas. Others are simply surnames and initials, but occasionally a clue will be added to the recipes, identifying the nationalities of French “Galibert”, Dutch “Oosterbaan” and “de Boehmler”. A complete “Mexican Dinner Menu” is donated by Tarbutton; a “Maltese Friday Lent Lunch” comes from “L. Naudi”; even a regional British recipe, “Stargazy Pie” from “J. Dart” - apparently a piscine speciality from Cornwall: “Traditionally the heads of the fish are left on, hence Stargazy”!





“THE MOST READABLE WORK[ON TOBACCO],
AND THE BEST KNOWN”
17) FAIRHOLT, F.W. Tobacco: Its History and Associations, Including an Account of The Plant and Its Manufacture; with Its Modes of Use in All Ages and Countries. Chatto and Windus, 1876 228

8vo. Original crimson cloth, richly tooled in gilt and black, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, surmounting on the spine A Red Indian Pipe of Peace, smoke billowing upwards, while on the upper cover, which is doubly ruled in black, is a substantial gilt and black vignette of “A Tobacconist’s Shop” from the time of James I, black endpapers; [viii] + pp. 322 (+ 32pp. detailed publishers’ booklist at rear), with an excellent hand-coloured engraved frontispiece, with tissue-guard, of 3 different Tobacco Plant and Their Parts, and copious wood-engraved illustrations throughout concerning Tobacco, and its Paraphernalia; an excellent copy inside and out, bar slight fading to the upper outer edge of the front pastedown, and minimal bubbling to the foot of the lower board, leaving this an extremely handsome copy of this sought-after book on the subject..

First edition. Arents: "The most readable and informative of popular 19th century English works on the subject and the best known." The book discusses The Tobacco Plant; Tobacco in America and Europe; The Literary Associations of Tobacco; The Use of Pipes, Cigars, Snuff, and everything else associated with The Art of Smoking.
Arents 1667.


A CLASSIC COOKERY BOOK,
FURTHER IMPROVED

18) FARLEY, John. The London Art of Cookery, and Housekeeper’s Complete Assistant. On a New Plan, Made Plain and Easy to The Understanding of Every Housekeeper, Cook, and Servant in The Kingdom. Containing, Proper Directions for The Choice of All Kinds of Provisions; Instructions for Trussing Poultry; Roasting and Boiling All Sorts of Butcher’s Meat, Poultry, Game, and Fish; Baking, Broiling, and Frying; Sauces for Every Occasion; Soups, Broths, Stews, and Hashes; Ragoos and Fricassees; Made Dishes, both Plain and Elegant; All Sorts of Pies and Puddings; Pancakes and Fritters; Proper Instructions for Dressing Fruits and Vegetables; Pickling, Potting, and Preserving. Containing, The Preparation of Hams, Tongues, and Bacon. To Keep Garden Stuffs and Fruits in Perfection; The Whole Art of Confectionary; The Preparation of Sugars; Tarts, Puffs, and Pastries; Cakes, Custards, Jams, and Jellies; Drying, Candying, and Preserving Fruits, &c. Elegant Ornaments for Entertainments; Instructions for Carving; Necessary Articles for Sea-Faring Persons; Made Wines, Cordial Waters, and Malt Liquors. To Which is Added, An Appendix, Containing Considerations on Culinary Poisons; Directions for Making Broths, &c. Embellished with A Head of The Author, and A Bill of Fare for Every Month in The Year, Elegantly Engraven on Thirteen Copper Plates. For J. Scatcherd and J. Whittaker; B. Law; and G. and T. Wilkie, 1796 350

8vo. Recent calf-backed tan cloth boards, spine ruled in gilt in 6 compartments with a burgundy morocco label at head, titled in gilt; [xxxvi (including “Contents” leaves) + pp. 459, with an excellent engraved portrait frontispiece of The Author, “Principal Cook at The London Tavern”, 12 engraved plates of Monthly Menus, as to be laid on the Table, and a 3pp. pair of “Tables” at rear, comparing cost of foodstuffs, by pound and stone, and Servants’ Wages; externally immaculate, while internally, there are new endpapers, and there is some staining to the inner margins of the “Menu” plates, as well as light browning to the frontispiece, leaving this, however, an extremely solid copy of a copious and extensive guide.

Seventh edition (according to Bitting). Preface to The First Edition.: “As This work is intended for the use of All Ranks in general,. not only those who have attained a Tolerable Knowledge of Cookery, but also to those who are but Young in Experience, we have occasionally given The Most Simple with the Most Sumptuous Dishes, and thereby directed them How Properly to Decorate the Table of either The Peer or The Mechanic.” Updated preface to this, The Seventh Edition: “We added upwards of 200 New and Elegant Receipts in The Various Branches of Cookery, &c., &c., to The Last Edition. The singular Approbation they met with has induced us to attempt still further improvements, and We have accordingly enriched the present Edition, with Several New and Useful Receipts, without depriving the Work of a single Article it before contained; but in order to make room for them, We have considerably increased the Number of Pages in This Edition.”

“SHAKESPEARE DINNERS”, “CITY MENUS”, “THE WINE CELLAR”, ETC.
19) “FIN-BEC” [JERROLD, William Blanchard] (“Author of The Epicure’s Year Book”). The Book of Menus. Grant & Co., 1876 498

8vo. Original green cloth, upper cover lavishly tooled in gilt and black, with a latticed floriate panel surmounted by the title in gilt, topped by a gilt Lobster, and tailed by a Wild Boar, the spine with a gilt Wild Strawberry, surmouted by the title, all edges gilt; viii + pp. 302 [each page with a crimson fillet border, and matching floriate cornerpieces] (+ 8pp. detailed adverts. at rear), with a fine tinted lithographed additional title, comprising 4 vignettes of Revelry, also recording additional authorship of “The Epicure’s Year Book, The Cupboard Papers,” Etc. “Tout se fait en dinant dans le siecle ou nous sommes, et c’est par les diners qu’on gourverne lest hommes. Moliere”; immaculate condition inside and out.

First edition. Preface: “The Epicure is the antithesis of The Glutton: it is to The Epicure that this book is addressed. He is simply the moderate, cultivated man who knows what to eat, and how to eat it. He is an economoist also, and a hater of waste.” Not only does The Author suggest appropriately lavish dinners, month by month, but also records famous dinners’ contents, and such oddities, as dinners inspired by Shakespeare!

Not in Bitting. Rare.



EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE NUT
20) FULLER, Andrew S. The Nut Culturist; A Treatise on The Propagation, Planting and Cultivation of Nut-Bearing Trees and Shrubs adapted to The Climate of The United States, with The Scientific and Common Names of The Fruit Known in Commerce as Edible or Otherwise Useful Nuts. New York, Orange Judd Company, 1908 228

8vo. Original dark green cloth, spine titled in gilt; viii + pp. 289 (+ 8pp. detailed related adverts. at rear), with a lithographed portrait frontispiece, after an original engraving, and no fewer than 107 wood-engraved plates and illustrations in text; mint condition inside and out, bar slight shadow from previous piece of loosely-inserted newsprint affecting verso of title, and first page of “Preface” only, leaving this a splendid copy.

First edition. Nuts covered in detail include: “The Almond”; “The Beechnut”; “Castanopsis”; “The Chestnut”, “Filbert or Hazelnut”, “Hickory Nuts”, and “The Walnut.”

LOCAL MALAYAN COOKERY
21) HING, Susie (Mrs.). In a Malayan Kitchen. Singapore, Mun Seong Press, [1956] 168

8vo. Original crimson cloth-backed bright yellow boards, titled in black on upper cover, surmounted by a steaming bowl, with 4 roundels containing the faces of the different races of “housewife”, for whom the book caters, East to West, pictorial advertising endpapers; pp. 99, with a wood-engraved frontispiece contrasting “The Old Type of Chinese Kitchen, with “The Modern Type of Chinese Kitchen”, a wood-engraved plate of the various utensils needed, and copious illustrations of local branded foodstuffs throughout; well-nigh immaculate condition inside and out, bar the traces of some removed sellotape, front and rear, where presumably manuscript recipes have been removed.

First edition. Preface: “One of the most attractive things about living in Malaya is its many and varied races ... This is just as true of Cookery as it is of other interests. I have included Chinese, Malay, Javanese, and Indian Recipes, as well as a few recipes of European Cakes and Desserts ... My thanks are due to Lady T.P.F. McNiece for so graciously consenting to write the foreword to my book..”

One copy only: BL.

22)HOLLAND, Mrs. Mary. The Complete Economical Cook, and Frugal Housewife; An Entirely New System of Domestic Cookery, containing Approved Directions for Purchasing and Cooking. Also, Trussing & Carving; Perparing soups, Gravies, Sauces, Made Dishes, Potting, Pickling, &c. With Directions for Pastry and Confectionery. Likewise the Art of Making British Wines, Brewing, Baking, &c. Printed for Thomas Tegg, 1838 228

Large 12mo. Original embossed brown embossed cloth, the covers with an all-embracing strapwork design, the rounded spine titled in gilt at head (“Domestic Cookery by Mrs. Holland”); xlviii + pp. 49-432, with a fine engraved frontispiece of “The Cook in His Kitchen”, surrounded by utensils and ingredients piled high, additional title with a substantial vignette of a Thatched Farmhouse and Yard, complete with Domestic Animals, Beehives, etc., an engraved “Table Setting” for “First” and “Second Course”, each involving 10 plates, and 3 diagrammatic plates of various roasts, showing how the various points for “Carving” and “Trussing”; light rubbing to head and foot of spine, while internally, well-nigh immaculate, bar light spotting at front and rear, this is a very good copy of a comprehensive cookery book that is missing from 2 of the best-known culinary bibliographies.

Fourteenth edition, “Considerably amended and enlarged, the result of thirty years’ practice.” Preface: “If cookery has been worth studying, as a sensual gratification, it is surely much more so as a means of securing one of the greates of human blessings - good health.” So comments the preface to this excellent collation of recipes, bills of fare, and food preparations, as well as sections at rear on “Brewing” and “British Wines.” Contemporary ownership inscription on front free-endpaper: “Anne Cox”.

cf. Cagle 752:“Bitting notes a “6th edition”of 1830”; NOT IN VICAIRE.

A JOLLY ANANACHRONISM, NOW 50 YEARS OLD
23) MACKENZIE, Compton. Sublime Tobacco [A Celebration]. Chatto and Windus, 1957 228

8vo. Original tan cloth, spine titled in gilt; [x] + pp. 352, with a collotype frontispiece aftre an original engraving of an “American Indian Village, 1590”, showing “Communal Tobacco Plots”, etc., 7 other similar related plates; well-nigh immaculate inside and out.

First edition. This is a defiantly pro-smoking tract, as seen in The Preface: “If a doctor should declare that I must either give up smoking or give up drinking alcohol for the rest of my life, I should reply without a moment’s hesitation and with the austerity of a stoic: “Then I renounce wine and spirits and will drink nothing but water for the rest of my life. I will never renounce my Pipe, and Whenever anybody offers me a Cigar, I shall accept that Cigar with gratitude and Smoke it with pleasure. My Yearly Resolution on New Year’s Eve shall be Not to Give up Smoking in The New Year.

FINE COPY OF THE RARE FIRST AUSTRALIAN COOKERY BOOK

24)MACLURCAN, Hannah. Mrs. Maclurcan’s Cookery Book; A Collection of Practical Recipes Specially Suitable for Australia. Townsville [Australia], [Privately Printed for The Author by] T. Wilmett & Sons., 1895. 595

8vo. Original black pebbled cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover; [iv] + pp.260 (+ unused “Memorandum” sheets at rear, and no fewer than 40pp. of local advertisements for all manner of food, drink, and hostelry); slight scuffing to lower board edges and foot of spine, but internally immaculate, this is an excellent example of the first expansion of the first Australian cookery book.

Second “Revised and Enlarged” edition. As “The Queenslander” put it in a review of Maclurcan’s first edition: “Housekeepers for a long time have been wanting a Cookery Book adapted to Colonial resources. The book we have for review will meet all these wants and is written by one of the best cooks in Australia, Mrs. Maclurcan, Queen’s Hotel, Townsville”. No fewer than 12 other local newspapers pour acclaim on her book. Among the recipes that will seem familiar to European readers, such examples as “Jugged Wallaby”; “Barramundi a la Normandie” and “Pawpaw Preserve” stand out as strictly local fare! Mrs. Maclurcan adds to her worth by including 20pp. of suggested “Menus”), a selection of “Household Hints”, and finally, suggestions for maintaining cleanliness, and a pure complexion: “An equal quantity of lemon juice and rose water and glycerine, mixed with the white of an egg (which has been previously beaten up) removes sunburn and freckles and renders the skin soft and delicate.”

NOT IN BITTING. RARE.


A DELIGHTFUL LITTLE IRISH ANGLING GUIDE
25)MATSON, Walter J. Salmon & Trout Fishing in Ireland; The Angler’s Pocket-Book and Guide. Dublin, Browne & Nolan, 1910. 228
Large 12mo. Original blue cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, the upper cover incorporating a substantial gilt vignette of a fisherman wrestling with some large prey; vii + pp. 199 (+ 8pp. detailed and related adverts, incorporating vignettes), with 6 fine mounted coloured plates of flies, and a folding tinted engraved map of Ireland, “Showing The Fishery Districts, with The Numbers corresponding to Those Shown in The Calendar”; small dint to fore-edges of covers, and minimal spotting to fore-edges, but otherwise, this remains avery good copy of this excellent local angling guide.
First edition. Preface: “In this book, I have aimed at giving such information as the angler may require, not only as regards where to fish in Ireland, but also as to how he can most readily and conveniently reach any particular resort ...” The author goes on: “I wish to thank Messrs. Hardy of Alnwich, to whom I am much indebted for their kind help in securing the three-colour reproduction of Salmon and Trout Flies ...”

Not in Fitzgerald Hampton. Rare.

26)MOFFAT, A.S. The Secrets of Angling [A Comprehensive Guide to Fishing - and to Cooking - Salmon and Trout, and All The Equipment Required]. Edinburgh, Adam & Charles Black, 1865. 298

8vo. Original dark green cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, in both cases surmounting a gilt roundel of intertwined fishes, burgundy endpapers; [xii] + pp. 326, with a detailed wood-engraved title vignette of a fisherman, a segmented gilt “reel” printed on the front free-endpaper (“Key to The Secrets or How to Angle ... The Figures Indicate The Pages where The Subjects are Treated”), and 27 wood-engraved illustrations in text of rods and tackle, specific to different rods and prey; light rubbing to extremities, while internally, there is a light sprinkling of spots to the title, and a small dint to the title and front free-endpaper, but otherwise, this is a very good copy of a detailed appreciation.

First edition. Not only are there individual chapters on necessary equipment, The Trout, and The Salmon, and copious anecdotes, but also, separate sections on “Minnow-Fishing”; “Night-Fishing”; “Cad-Bait and Maggot-Fishing”, and among the various cooking techniques described at rear, are methods for “Potting, Preserving, and Kippering Trout”: “Salmon, I need scarcely say, may be disposed of in a similar manner, whenver the sportsman is fortunate enough to get hold of them.”

Westwood & Satchell p.



AN AMAZING STORY!

27)NEWALL, Captain J.T. Scottish Moors and Indian Jungles: Scenes of Sport in The Lews and India. Hurst and Blackett, Limited, 1889. 398

8vo. Recent crimson half morocco, spine gilt in 6 compartments, titled in 2, incorporating a dark green morocco label, titled in gilt, 4 other compartments with alternating centrally-placed gilt motifs of a Trumpeting Elephant, and a Stag, raised bands, top edges gilt; [x] + pp. 320 (+ 14 pp. detailed publishers’ booklist), with a fine wood-engraved frontispiece and 11 other wood-engraved plates; immaculate condition inside and out, making this an extremely handsome copy of one of Newell’s rarer sporting works.

First edition. Printed on Fine Paper. The division between the 2 regions described in the title can be seen from a selection of illustrations: “Stalk of The Ten Pointer”; “The First Woodcock of The Season. Loch Roag”; “Hog Hunting - My First Charge. The Deccan”; “Bear-Shooting in The Ghauts - Taken Unawares”; and “Our First Tiger. Guzerat.” Czech: “Newall divides his time between stalking Red Deer, Grouse Shooting and Angling for Salmon in Scotland, with Hunts for Tiger, Bear, Wild Boar, and Other Game in India. There is also Note of Pig-Sticking.” Chute: “The first part is on Shooting, Fishing and Stalking on The Moors, with a Chapter on Fishing in Devon. The second part is on Big Game Shooting.” Amazingly, the author continued to hunt, even after breaking his back falling from a horse and being “Paralysed in The Lower Limbs”! Read on: “With regard to the poles, I fully succeeded. With one man in The Shafts, so to speak, in front, and one similarly placed behind, with 2, one on each side, to assist the latter, he having the principal weight, I can manage to ascend High Hills, and get carried to places and over ground which would have ben quite inaccessible to a Pony. [In this way], I shoot over dogs, and even Stalk Deer with success, though of course, it is shooting under difficulties”!

Czech p. 148; Chute 469.

A POWERFUL ATTACK ON OPIUM, PRINTED IN CALCUTTA

28) [OPIUM] ANON. The Consumption of Opium in India. A Critique of The Memorandum Presented by Sir William Roberts, M.D., F.R.S., as Medical Member of The Late Royal Commission on Opium. Calcutta: Office of the Indian Medical Record, 150 Dharamtala Street, 1895 395

Large 12mo. Original turquoise stapled wrappers, titled printed in black, contained in a specially-constructed black cloth fall-down-back box, with crimson calf label, titled in gilt: “Opium in India”, and dated in gilt at foot: “Calcutta 1895”; pp. 51; infinitesimal rubbing and wrinkling to wrappers, but internally immaculate, this is an excellent survival of a controversial little pamphlet on the subject.

First separately printed edition, “Reprinted, after Revision, from “The Indian Medical Record”.” This is a powerful and lucid rebuttal of any attempt to downplay the deleterious effects of Opium Consumption. It had been implied that Opium had a similar effect to Tea or Coffee drinking; the editor here begs to differ: “It is a striking instance in point that China, an Opium Consuming Nation, falls defeated and demoralised before Japan, an anti-opium nation, numerically seven times its inferior!”


HOW TO COOK FISH
29) “PISCATOR” [HUGHES, William]. A Practical Treatise on The Choice and Cookery of Fish. By Piscator. Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1854. 598

8vo. Original mottled burgundy cloth, upper cover with a centrally-placed gilt vignette, showing a trio of “landed” fish, spine titled in gilt; iv + pp. 291 (+ 24pp. detailed publisher’s booklist at rear, and with further booklists, “Books of General Utility”, and “Books for Young Persons”, printed on the front and rear pastedowns); well-nigh immaculate inside and out, bar the usual slight discoloration of endpapers, leaving this as good a copy as one could hope for of this rare cookery book.
“Second edition” - in fact, the first edition with this title - a work with similar subject matter had been published by the author in 1843. Preface: “Even in the very best of these [cookery] books, a great number of our most common and useful fishes are omitted altogether; whilst others are slightly glossed over, little being said about the edible merits, or by what particular mode of cookery they may be turned to the most profitable advantage. As a proof of this, we have searched in vain for something about the qualities of the John Dory, which, although one of the best fishes the sea has produced, is altogether unnoticed; nor can we find the Ling - a very common, and yet one of the most useful fishes taken upon our coasts - spoken of otherwise than as dried salt fish ... And we shall afford all the the information we can collect as to the various ways in which each individual species may be cooked, so as to appear at table to the greatest possible advantage.”

cf. Bittting p. 593; Cagle 765; Simon 1183.



A FINE COPY IN ITS DUST-JACKET
30) PITMAN, Capt. C.R.S. A Game Warden among His Charges. Nisbet & Co., Ltd., bvc [1931] 327

Original green cloth, spine titled in gilt, with the original orange dust-jacket, titled in green; xvi + pp. 336, with a fine photographic frontispiece of “Edmund Heller’s Giant Gorilla from Mt. Sabinio”, 24 other excellent captioned photographic plates, and a folding Lithographed Map of Uganda at rear; some slight uniform fading to covers, and darkening to spine of dust-jacket, slightly percolating to cloth beneath, but internally immaculate, this is a very good copy of one of Pitman’s most sought-after titles.

First edition. Czech: “The Author examines a variety of Game while relating his Hunting Experiences after Rhinoceros, Elephant near The River Kerio south of Lake Rudolf, Lion in Uganda, and with long Chapters on Gorillas and Crocodiles: “In shooting a Crocodile, no mater of which species, the Safest Shot is at The Neck ..”

Czech p. 131.



THE “FIRST SOUTHERN COOKBOOK” (BITTING)
31)RANDOLPH, Mrs. Mary. The Virginia Housewife: Or, Methodical Cook. Philadelphia, E.H. Butler & Co., 1846 298

8vo. Original burgundy morocco-backed original printed boards, title printed in black on the upper cover, with publisher’s booklist printed on the lower cover; xii + pp. 13-180; binding heavily rubbed and stained, but holding, while internally only intermittent light spotting, and marginal marking, this remains a good and solid copy of a pioneering work of American Cuisine.

Previous owner's date of "1844" at head of Introduction. An historic cook book containing traditional Virginia and other southern dishes. This is probably the earliest "Southern regional" cook book published and is an authoritative source for Virginia, and coastal Southern cuisine of the period. It includes Recipes for Sweetbread and Oyster Pie, Milk Rice, Vinegars, Preserves, Creams, Turtle Soup (including directions for “Cleaning a Whole Turtle”) as well as “Mock Turtle Soup” (from a Calf's Head!), Condiments, Pickles, Beverages (Hot and Cold), Shrubs, and many other foods and preparations of the early American South. The author Mary Randolph was born to a “Society” family in Virginia (1762-1828), and Ran a fashionable boarding house in Richmond. She wrote this book as a record of her own Recipes, and those of her acquaintances and family.

Bitting p. 388; Lowenstein 152.


AN EXTENSIVE LITTLE HERBAL
32) ROBINSON, Matthew. The New Family Herbal: Comprising a Description, and The Medical Virtues of British and Foreign Plants, Founded on The Works of Eminent Modern English and American Writers on The Medical Properties of Herbs: To Which is Added, The Botanical Family Physician; Valuable Medical Receipts; and Important Directions Regarding Diet, Clothing, Bathing, Air, Exercise, &c., &c., W. Nicholson & Sons, Limited, [n.d.] 228

Small 8vo. Original burgundy cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, surmouting on the upper cover a spray of flowers blocked in blind, while the spine has an elaborate gilt and blind design incorporating another spray of flowers interspersed with the title: “Robinson’s New Family Herbal, Comprising a Description of The Medical Properties and THe Mode of Using British and Foreign Herbs with Engravings of 130 Plants, Also The Botanic Family Physician”; pp. 480, with an elegant floriate lithographed additional title and frontispiece, both blocked in rose-pink, and 24 chromolithographed botanical plates, each with multiple images; immaculate condition inside and out, making this a highly desirable copy of an extensive little herbal.

(?) First edition. Robinson is forward-looking for his time, arguing for an eradication of superstition and myth, in the analysis of the benefits of Herbal Medicine: “The government of Herbs by The Sun, The Moon, and The Stars has been exploded by Modern Science; and is now regarded by persons of ordinary capacity to be absurd in the extreme. Botanical knowledge has been greatly augmented of late years. The properties of Herbs, by scientific study , and by Medical Experience, are now better understood than they were in the days of Culpeper and others. The Botanic system of Medicine is making rapid progress, [and] it would be the greatest folly to perpetuate the ignorance and absurdities of ancient Herbalists.”



LIMITED EDITION HERBAL, WITH BIBLIOGRAPHY
33) ROHDE, Eleanour Sinclair. The Old English Herbals [including an Important Bibliography]. The Minerva Press, 1972

4to. Original tan buckram, titled in gilt at head of spine; title in black, with a centrally-placed vignette, blocked in crimson, of an orchard in full bloom, xii + pp. 243 [including a 54pp. detailed Bibliography of Early Herbals at rear, of Manuscript, English and Foreign Herbals], with an evocative frontispiece after a 12th century copy of “The Herbal of Apuleius”, showing “Herbs being Dug Up and Made into Medicines under The Direction of a Sage”, and 17 other plates after frontispieces, etc. of iconic herbals; immaculate condition inside and dout.

Limited edition, number 100 of 500 copies only, with wide margins. Preface: “No pains have been sparted to make the bibliographies as complete as possible ...”



34)RUNDELL, Maria Eliza. A New System of Domestic Cookery; Formed upon Principles of Economy, and Adapted to The Use of Private Families. By a Lady. With The Addition of Many New Receipts. Halifax, Milner and Sowerby, 1853. 228

8vo. Original crimson cloth, flat gilt spine, elaborately tooled with an all-embracing design of gathered game, including hanging venison, gamebirds, fish and fruit, the upper cover tooled with blind strapwork cornerpieces, encompassing a centrally-placed gilt vignette of a Fisher-Girl, displaying her wares; lii + pp. 350, with a fine steel-engraved frontspiece and additional title (“Domestic Cookery for The Use of Private Families”), and 9 wood-engraved plates on heavier paper stock, showing various cuts, etc. of various meats; neatly rebacked with the original spine laid down, externally very fresh and bright, bar a couple of tiny white flecks at foot of spine, and minimal rubbing to extemities, while internally, there are new endpapers, matching the old, and occasional light spotting, but overall, this remains an extremely attractive copy of a renowned and sought-after culinary work.

New edition. Preface: “The Mistress of a family should always remembere that the welfare and good management of the house depends on the eye of the superiorand consequently that nothing is too trifling for her notice, whereby waste may be avoided; and this attention is of more importance now that the price of every necessary of life is increased to an enormous degree”. This famous work, which ran into many editions, is renowned for introducing the world’s first published recipe for the “Scotch Egg”!

Cf. Bitting p. 410.


35) SENN, C. Hermann. The Art of The Table: Including How to Wait at Table; How to Fold Napkins and How to Carve. Ward, Lock & Co., Limited, 1923 127

8vo. Original light grey cloth, titled in black on spine and upper cover, surmounting on the upper cover a vignette of a Butler’s Tray, with Decanter, 3 Glasses, and a Bowl; pp. 128, with an evocative photographic frontispiece showing 2 Table Settings: “1. Supper Tables for a Hunt Ball” and “2. Table for an Elaborate Supper”, and 12 other full-page photographic plates in text, and illustrations throughout, both photographic and diagrammatic (napkin-folding, etc.); upper cover bumped at corner and foot, and a fleck of red ink to the head of the lower cover, but internally immaculate, this is a lovely crisp copy of an essential servants’ guide.

Third edition. Preface: “The term Service rightly embraces, besides actual Waiting, many other attendant arts. Not least among these is Carving. The art of carving is described and illustrated in the following pages in a manner at once clear and precise, detailed, and yet easy to comprehend. The important matter of Laying the Table is also considereed in all its details ... [Likewise,] another aspect of elegant table-laying is treated in the section devoted to Napkin Folding. Herein are shown a number of things an artistic waiter or waitress may do with a napkin, together with directions and diagrams for some of the prettiest and most modern designs ...”


A COMPLETE SET OF ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL CULINARY GUIDES.
36) SIMON, Andre. A Concise Encyclopaedia of Gastronomy; [with] Wines and Liqueurs from A-Z; [with] The Wine Conoisseur’s Catechism [THE COMPLETE SET], The Wine and Food Society, c. 1935-45. 328

8vo. 3 works. 11 vols. Original various coloured cloth bindings, with dust-jackets; or Original wrappers (as issued); c. 1000 pages; slight fraying to head of vol. III (Vegetables), but otherwise well-nigh immaculate inside and out, the whole, contained in a specially-constructed black cloth fall-down-back box, with crimson cloth labels (“Andre Simon on Gastronomy and Fine Wines”).
FIRST EDITIONS.

37) SOAMES, Peter. A Treatise on The Manufacture of Sugar from The Sugar Cane. E. & F.N. Spon, 1872. 228

Tall 8vo. Original burgundy cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover; viii + pp. 136, with a folding wood-engraved frontispiece “High Pressure Gothic Portable Beam Engine and Sugar Mill”, with tissue-guard, and 6 other folding wood-engraved plates, 5 at rear, and copious illustrations throughout; spine slightly chipped at head, but otherwise well-nigh immaculate inside and out.

First edition. Preface: “In issuing this treatise upon the Practical Manufacture of Sugar in The Colonies, we beg to mention that it is almost entirely the result of experience gained both in The West and East Indies during the last 20 years ... We trust that the designs [machinery] that we veture to place before our readers, may be of sufficient use to enable them to produce a first-class sugar”.

38) [STEPHEN, John.] A Treatise on The Manufacture, Imitation and Reduction of Foreign Wines, Brandies, Rums, Etc., Etc. Including “Old Rye” Whiskey, “Old Rye Monongahela”, “Wheat”, and “Bourbon” Whiskeys, Fancy Brandies, Cordials, and Domestic Liquors. Based on The “French System”. Philadelphia, for The Author, 1860 228

8vo.

Making wine is the main focus of this book but we are also shown how to make good imitations of scotch whiskey or Irish whiskey or bourbon.

Gabler 38040; Amerine & Borg 3330. Not in Bitting. Rare.



39) [TAMIL COOKERY] “THE LADIES’ COMMITEE F.I.N.S. WOMEN’S WORKSHOP”. A Friend in Need English-Tamil Cookery Book. Madras, The Diocesan Press, Vepery, 1938 228

8vo. Original brown cloth-backed brown yellow and white boards, the upper cover with the image of a Flamboyant Tamil Waiter carrying a Large Steaming Pie, by I.R. Warre; iv + pp. 332, with a splendid frontispiece, also by Warre, showing the lady of the house losing much of her instruction, through mis-translation by an “intermediary”: “We [The Compilers of The Book] claim that it will place the mistress in direct communication with The Cook, and enable The Cook to understand his instructions first hand.” (Preface).

Second (“enlarged” and “corrected”) edition. Preface: “Readers may feel that they are getting something that should effect and enormous saving in time, money, nervous energy and indigeston.” The predominantly British fare is described in detail in both English and Tamil to help prevent communication breakdown between a mistress and her cook in Madras and other Tamil speaking areas.The Friend-in-Need Society provided a home for the destitute Europeans and Anglo-Indians in Madras.




A UNIQUE COPY, EXTRA-ILLUSTRATED, AND ANNOTATED BY AUTHOR AND RECIPIENT
40)TEGETMEIER, W.B. Pheasants: Their Natural History annd Practical Management. Horace Cox, 1897. 898

8vo. Original black cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, contained in a black specially-constructed box, with burgundy leather labels and silk tie, titled in gilt, and further containing a separate integral flapcase, containing related papers and correspondence; [xii] + pp. 237 (+ 2pp. publisher’s notices and associated book listings at rear), with a collotype frontispiece of a Prince of Wales Pheasant by J. Smit, and 15 other plates by Tegetmeier, wood-engraved illustrations; spine neatly repaired at joints, and some occasional very light soiling internally, leaving this an extremely good and unique copy of this highly important treatise on The King of The Game Birds.

Third edition, enlarged”. Inscribed on the front free-endpaper: “J.E. Harting with the sincere regards, J.W. Tegetmeier. July 1897.” This is an amazing an unique copy of this renowned, and much reprinted work on the pheasant. What makes it extraordinary is the sheer volume of material that has been added by Harting, subsequent to his receipt of it from the author! In fact, so much was added that the book was splitting at the joints, and it was considered sensible to have the box built, incorporating a flapcase for additional material. This comprises everything from neatly clipped advertisements for helpful sporting equipment (“non-straying mixture”, etc.), through inscribed pamphlets, to personal “letters to the editor”, several incorporating drawings, or photographs to illustrate various sporting points - items covered include incidents of “Pheasants Flying Through Windows”; “A Pheasant’s Attempt to Fly Across Loch Ness”; “A Pheasant’s Nest Found in A Squirrel’s Drey”, and “Fifteenth Century Pheasant Rearing”. There are copious insights given on the effects of The Fox on Pheasants and Partridges. The majority of these clippings and letters have been tipped in opposite their relevant passages of text. Of particular interest, there are 2 autograph letters, signed, one by the ornithological illustrator F.W. FROHAWK, discussing, and illustrating a patent bird-scarer; the other by LORD LILFORD, and illustrated by an original photograph, discussing the incident of a pheasant nesting in a tree, and the detrimental effect on its brood. Anker: “This favourite book, to whose popularity a number of editions testify. The different sections of the work deal with The Natural History of Pheasants, their Management in Preserves and in Confinent, and the Diseases of these birds; they also describe all the different species adapted to The Covert and The Aviary.”

Anker 500.

41)TIMBS, John. Club Life of London, with Anecdotes of The Clubs, Coffee-Houses and Taverns of The Metropolis During The 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries. Richard Bentley, Publisher in Ordinary to Her Majesty, 1866. 328

8vo. 2 vols. Original navy blue cloth, spines titled in gilt, inside floriate gilt cartouches, ribbed covers tooled in blind; xii + pp. 324, and xi + pp. 320, with fine engraved frontispieces, of Captain Charles Norris by W. Greatbach, “from the Original Picture in the Possession of the Family”, and of George Colman, The Elder, after the original by Joshua Reynolds; minimal darkening to spines, with the gilt still bright, and light rubbing to extemities, while internally the frontispieces are lightly spotted, with slight offsetting to the titles, however remaining in fine and tight original condition, leaving this an extremely handsome set of this important collation.

First edition. Preface: “Few attempts have been made to focus the Club-Life of periods, or to assemble with reasonable limits, the histories of the leading Associations of Clubbable men - of Statesmen and Politicians, Wits and Poets, Authors, Artists, and Actors, and “Men of`Wit and Pleasure”, which the town has presented since the days of The Restoration; or in more direct succession, and from The Reign of Queen Anne, and the days of The Tatler and Spectator, and other Essayists in their wake. The present Work aims to record this Club-life, in a series of sketches of the leading Societies ...” Clubs featured include such famous ones as “The Kit-Kat”; “Brooke’s”, “Boodle’s”, and “White’s”, not to mention, “The Oxford and Cambridge”, amongst others equally renowned. Engraved bookplate of George Montgomery Traherne.

42)TYACKE, Lieut.-Col. R.H. In Quest of Game: A Sportsman’s Manual for Game Shooting in Kulu, Lahoul and Ladak to The Tso Morari Lake. With Notes on Shooting in Spiti, Bara, Bagahal, Chamba and Kashmir, and A Detailed Description of Sport in More Than 130 Nalas. Calcutta and Simla, Thacker, Spink & Co., 1927. 598

Small 8vo. Original crimson cloth, titled in black on spine and upper cover, publishers’ art nouveau floral endpapers; x + pp. 202, with 8 large folding maps of the various areas; a nice brigh copy, affected only by a small black spot to the upper cover, and slight bumping to the upper outer corners, leaving this a very good copy of an excellent little guide to the sporting potential in the region.

First edition, revised. Contemporary review: “Those who wish to shoot in The Kangra District, or right up to Ladakh, could not do better than to get that interesting and well-written little book by Colonel Tyacke, the most practical work ever penned by a Himalayan sportsman” (cf. “The Guide to Dharmsala, etc.” by J. Fitzgerald Lee). This edition contains approximately 70 more pages than the 1893 first edition, and has an extra map (of Chamba). It is a superbly useful little book with well-drawn maps, most of which include routes which are described in detail in the text. This is a scarce work, originally provided for the use of officers with three months leave.The initial section gives general information (useful hints, camps, game laws) and the remaining sections deal with each of the areas in turn giving suggested routes, notes on game, local people, etc. Czech: “Tyacke includes numerous episodes of his own hunting experiences as well as sporting expeditions with his wife [cf. “How I Shot My Bears” by Mrs. Tyacke (1893).”

Yakushi T 145b (has this edition only); cf. Czech p. 217 (1893 ed. only).



A SPLENDID LITTLE VOLUME

43) “A VETERAN OF SMOKEDOM” The Smoker’s Guide, Philosopher and Friend; What to Smoke-What to Smoke with-and the Whole “What’s What” of Tobacco, Historical, Botanical, Manufactural, Anecdotal, Social, Medical, &c., &c., &c., Hardwicke & Bogue, 1876 128

Small 8vo. Original green cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover, surmounting, on the upper cover, a substantial gilt vignette blocked in gilt and black, of a Cross-Legged and Turbanned Eastern Character, smoking a Hookah; [viii] + pp. 184, with a wood-engraved frontispiece of “Tobacco Plants”, with tissue-guard; light rubbing to extremities, while internally only a very light sprinkling of spots, leaving this a delightful copy of this little anachronistic celebration of the joys of tobacco, and its products.

First edition. Preface: “The invention of smoking is one of the most remarkable events in the history of mankind. It seems to be more or less connnected with man’s religious instincts. Smoke, Fume, or Perfume of some sort, from the earliest times was an emblem of divine satisfaction. The pagan gods were supposed to sniff and delight in the fume of sacrifice ... and not only was the fume of something burnt offered up in order to please the god whom he worshipped, but man also burnt it to please himself ... one fact is certain - Tobacco came upon civilised man as a conquering hero.”





FAMOUS LIBEL LAWYER’S COPY, INSCRIBED BY THE AUTHOR
44)WENTWORTH-DAY, J. The Dog in Sport. Geoge G. Harrap & Co., 1938. 248

8vo. Original dark green cloth, spine titled in gilt, surmounting a gilt vignette of a greyhound; pp.320, with a fine photographic frontispiece of “Miss J. Wykeham-Musgrave’s Field Trial Champion Spaniel Poodle “Crinkle” retrieving a Rabbit over a Stone Wall”, and 37 other photographic plates on 29 leaves; immaculate condition inside and out, apart from a light spott ot he foot of the upper cover, leaving this an excellent and tight copy of a splendid book, with an illustrious provenance.

First edition. Presentation copy, inscribed in ink on the front free-endpaper to the famous libel lawyer: “Peter F. Carter-Ruck from The Author. Jim Wentworth-Day. 1945”, and further signed by the author on the title. Preface: “The Dog is not merely The Servant, but The Friend, The Fellow-Sportsman, The Sharer in man’s most primitive and masculine delights. I have tried in these chapters to give pictures of days which I have known in the still unspoiled places of that older, lovelier England which lingers stubbornly where no factory smoke stains the upper air. There is, thank God, plenty of it still. And in those precious memories, a common heritate to most of us, The Dog was our partner.” This a wonderful book, written with great brio, about “Man’s Best Friend”, and his unique relationship with us.



A CAUTIONARY TALE, BUT INTERSPERSED
WITH SOLID ADVICE ON A GOOD DIET

45) [WHITING, Sydney]. The Memoirs of A Stomach. Written by Himself that All who Eat may Read. Edited by a Minister of The Interior. W.E. Painter, [1854] 228

8vo. Original grass-green cloth, titled in gilt on upper cover, above a gilt vignette of a libation cup, with Classical motifs, reprised in blind on the lower cover, and floriate cornerpieces to both covers; xvi + pp. 9-135 [identical pagination to Bitting’s cited copy of the 6th edition], with an excellent satirical engraved frontispiece, showing the Nightmare being Experienced by a Bloated Individual, surrounded by the Maelstrom of Foodstuffs careering about in his Innards, and an excellent title vignette, depicting a Fantastic Struggle between a Mythic “Sentry of The Stomach”, fighting off several Demons of Indigestion; well nigh immaculate inside and out, this is a very good copy of A Splendid Expose of The Gourmand.

Fourth edition (“Revised, with Additions”). This is a Fanciful Account of The Digestive Process, apparently written by a Medical Man, with passages in Verse and Dialogue. The Author considers the Care and Treatment of The Stomach, and includes a Number of Prescriptions for Digestive Ailments. Bitting: “Vicaire cites a French translation by Dr. C.H. Gros, 3rd edition, reviewed and augmented, 1876.”

Bitting p. 578; cf. Vicaire.














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